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- Have opened the file, what do the numbers relate to in excel..
reload the file

- Can you tell us what are KV, and RV.
i mean crank and cam sensor

- Apart from starting, and going on this pump is a pump that must be set on timing and correct, as in 19 teeth between cam to pump marking..
timing belt set correctly

- Does it start the first thing in the morning?
Everything is good in the morning

-Do you lose power at any time while driving?
Everything is good at time while driving

-Is it good, bad on fuel?
Fuel ok

-Do you get any management lights on, especially when giving it?
STOP lights on when trying to start warm engine after 5 sec.
 

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Super fantastic Mod Technical Supremo Nice Guy
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@[U]Nicagua[/U]
Will need explain a bit better than that.
We have no idea what you have opened..
 

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There seems to be a recurring non-start problem with the 1.5 dCi; there have been numerous threads regarding this recently. Rather than type the same thing in response to each new poster, I thought it'd be good to make a check list of basic, initial tests to narrow down the problem. The thread can be linked to in future when a new non-start thread pops up.

This list is not exhaustive and is not necessarily designed to find the fault. It is designed to furnish you with a better picture of the health of various components of your engine that can affect starting. This thread is a starting point only: further research may be required by you after running these tests to determine the exact nature of the fault.

To anyone with a reasonable level of mechanical knowledge, this information will be teaching granny to suck eggs so it is not designed for you. I'm well aware that you know all of this information (and more) already. This is to help people who may not know about these things to check.

Much of the data has come from my (2001-2005 Clio) Haynes. If you haven't got a Haynes, buy one: it's cheap and will help you.

One last thing: the below is only to be used and acted upon if you have more than 2 brain cells. Please check to see if you're an idiot or not before trying any of these tests. If you find that you are an idiot, please do not procede any further. If you break your own car, it is your fault. You are an adult: make an informed, reasoned, balanced decision to continue. If you get a kick out of fixing things that are broken and enjoy saving money, please continue.




So, your dCi didn't (or struggled to) start this morning and you've just posted a thread about it on the forum.

Did it turn over fast or slowly?

Put a multimeter across the battery terminals with the engine off. What is the voltage? It should be ~12.6v (Haynes, 2010) or more.

Now put the multimeter across the terminals with the engine idling. What is the voltage? It should be between ~13.5v and ~14.8v (Haynes, 2010). If it is, congratulations; your alternator and auxilary belt are working well.

If your voltage is low at rest, your battery may be at fault, you may have a parasitic drain or your charging system may have a fault (which should show up in the idle test).


Are there any DTCs?

Diagnostic Trouble Codes. Ideally use CAN Clip or DDT2000 to read the Renault-specific codes. Alternatively, use a cheap eBay ELM327 wireless/bluetooth adapter and a free app (Torque for Android or something similar for Apple) to interrogate the car's ECUs.
If there are DTCs stored, what are they? Google the code to find out more.
The code could be a red herring! Delete all of them and run/start the engine again. Now reconnect the code reader and check for DTCs again. Are there any there or are they all gone? Any new ones now are likely to be genuine codes, not red herrings. Investigate these.

If a code points to a particular sensor, the resistance readings of that sensor can commonly be found in Haynes or online. Before condemning the sensor, test it with your multimeter!

Clean the TDC sensor.

Top Dead Centre.
This is recommended commonly on the forum for any non-start issue, including petrols. As the sensor collects ferrous particles over time, the signal to the ECU can become weak/erratic. A quick clean may solve your problem.
The sensor is located in the top of the bell housing.

Clean the EGR and intake pipe.

Another commonly recommended course of action is to clean the EGR and the inlet pipe, at the back of the engine. They can clog up and cause running issues. An ill-functioning EGR will likely (but not always) throw a DTC.

Are your glow plugs working properly?

Your engine prefers working glow plugs in order to start. The injection pressures in a DI diesel are usually enough to start the engine without glow plug assistance in all but the coldest climes, but having the plugs working properly certainly helps.
Using your multimeter, measure the resistance between the upper wiring contact and the glow plug body. You can do this in situ to save breaking out the socket set and potentially snapping a plug off in the head. Each plug should have a resistance of 0.6 ohms (Haynes, 2010).

Check the inherent resistance in your multimeter leads before this test, then remove this number from the indicated glow plug resistance to get their true resistance!

This is a good video of how to test your glow plugs:
Yes, it's for a D5 engine but the principle is the same.

Have you got a voltage supply to your glow plugs?

Put the multimeter back to VDC and check that the glow plug supply wire is receiving voltage when the ignition is switched on. It should maintain a voltage for several seconds after the glow plug light has extinguised, too.

Carry out a leak off test.

If your injectors leak back too much fuel they will rob the rail of pressure and the car will struggle to start (if at all). This is a known mode of failure for DI diesel engines, especially ones using a common rail.
You will need 4 lengths of tubing to attach to the return line output of each injector and 4 bottles for each to drip their fuel into. This equipment can be bought for very little cost. I've used tubing from a DIY store and drinks bottles with holes cut in the caps before to run this test and it has worked perfectly.
The return lines are under no pressure so you won't cut a limb off with high pressure spray, don't worry.

Start the engine (use Easy Start if you have to) and allow it to idle for a few minutes, max. The permissible fuel leak back differs between manufacturers but if one (or more) of your bottles looks like this, you have a failed injector:
The other three injectors in that video are leaking back agreeable amounts and are fine.

Enjoy that video? I thought so. Here's another:
After idling for ~1 minute, that guy has very little fuel in each cup. Did you notice how quickly and easily the engine started at the beginning? That was not a coincidence.

You are looking for consistancy here, not necessarily outright volumes. Searching Google and Youtube for 'Leak off test' should furnish you with all the information and examples you need to carry out this quick, easy, cheap and illuminating test.

If one or more of your injectors fail this test, they require refurbishment (specialist) or replacement. You can buy new or take a punt on a used one from a known-good engine. New or used, it'll likely require coding to your ECU. This can be done in CAN Clip or DDT2000, I believe. A suitably equipped garage or the main dealer can, of course, also do this.



That's the quick, basic list done.
Other faults can and will stop your car from starting, the above are just some common examples for the 1.5 dCi.

I've written all of this in relation to my 2003 Clio dCi 65 engine. I'm sure many are the same/similar but care should be taken with considerably different units (much newer, higher power output etc.) to ensure correct procedure and data.

If there are any Renault-specific glaring errors with any of the above or if you would like to add some more points for owners to check, chime in by all means.

:)
 

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Registered
Joined
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2 Posts
There seems to be a recurring non-start problem with the 1.5 dCi; there have been numerous threads regarding this recently. Rather than type the same thing in response to each new poster, I thought it'd be good to make a check list of basic, initial tests to narrow down the problem. The thread can be linked to in future when a new non-start thread pops up.

This list is not exhaustive and is not necessarily designed to find the fault. It is designed to furnish you with a better picture of the health of various components of your engine that can affect starting. This thread is a starting point only: further research may be required by you after running these tests to determine the exact nature of the fault.

To anyone with a reasonable level of mechanical knowledge, this information will be teaching granny to suck eggs so it is not designed for you. I'm well aware that you know all of this information (and more) already. This is to help people who may not know about these things to check.

Much of the data has come from my (2001-2005 Clio) Haynes. If you haven't got a Haynes, buy one: it's cheap and will help you.

One last thing: the below is only to be used and acted upon if you have more than 2 brain cells. Please check to see if you're an idiot or not before trying any of these tests. If you find that you are an idiot, please do not procede any further. If you break your own car, it is your fault. You are an adult: make an informed, reasoned, balanced decision to continue. If you get a kick out of fixing things that are broken and enjoy saving money, please continue.




So, your dCi didn't (or struggled to) start this morning and you've just posted a thread about it on the forum.

Did it turn over fast or slowly?

Put a multimeter across the battery terminals with the engine off. What is the voltage? It should be ~12.6v (Haynes, 2010) or more.

Now put the multimeter across the terminals with the engine idling. What is the voltage? It should be between ~13.5v and ~14.8v (Haynes, 2010). If it is, congratulations; your alternator and auxilary belt are working well.

If your voltage is low at rest, your battery may be at fault, you may have a parasitic drain or your charging system may have a fault (which should show up in the idle test).


Are there any DTCs?

Diagnostic Trouble Codes. Ideally use CAN Clip or DDT2000 to read the Renault-specific codes. Alternatively, use a cheap eBay ELM327 wireless/bluetooth adapter and a free app (Torque for Android or something similar for Apple) to interrogate the car's ECUs.
If there are DTCs stored, what are they? Google the code to find out more.
The code could be a red herring! Delete all of them and run/start the engine again. Now reconnect the code reader and check for DTCs again. Are there any there or are they all gone? Any new ones now are likely to be genuine codes, not red herrings. Investigate these.

If a code points to a particular sensor, the resistance readings of that sensor can commonly be found in Haynes or online. Before condemning the sensor, test it with your multimeter!

Clean the TDC sensor.

Top Dead Centre.
This is recommended commonly on the forum for any non-start issue, including petrols. As the sensor collects ferrous particles over time, the signal to the ECU can become weak/erratic. A quick clean may solve your problem.
The sensor is located in the top of the bell housing.

Clean the EGR and intake pipe.

Another commonly recommended course of action is to clean the EGR and the inlet pipe, at the back of the engine. They can clog up and cause running issues. An ill-functioning EGR will likely (but not always) throw a DTC.

Are your glow plugs working properly?

Your engine prefers working glow plugs in order to start. The injection pressures in a DI diesel are usually enough to start the engine without glow plug assistance in all but the coldest climes, but having the plugs working properly certainly helps.
Using your multimeter, measure the resistance between the upper wiring contact and the glow plug body. You can do this in situ to save breaking out the socket set and potentially snapping a plug off in the head. Each plug should have a resistance of 0.6 ohms (Haynes, 2010).

Check the inherent resistance in your multimeter leads before this test, then remove this number from the indicated glow plug resistance to get their true resistance!

This is a good video of how to test your glow plugs:
Yes, it's for a D5 engine but the principle is the same.

Have you got a voltage supply to your glow plugs?

Put the multimeter back to VDC and check that the glow plug supply wire is receiving voltage when the ignition is switched on. It should maintain a voltage for several seconds after the glow plug light has extinguised, too.

Carry out a leak off test.

If your injectors leak back too much fuel they will rob the rail of pressure and the car will struggle to start (if at all). This is a known mode of failure for DI diesel engines, especially ones using a common rail.
You will need 4 lengths of tubing to attach to the return line output of each injector and 4 bottles for each to drip their fuel into. This equipment can be bought for very little cost. I've used tubing from a DIY store and drinks bottles with holes cut in the caps before to run this test and it has worked perfectly.
The return lines are under no pressure so you won't cut a limb off with high pressure spray, don't worry.

Start the engine (use Easy Start if you have to) and allow it to idle for a few minutes, max. The permissible fuel leak back differs between manufacturers but if one (or more) of your bottles looks like this, you have a failed injector:
The other three injectors in that video are leaking back agreeable amounts and are fine.

Enjoy that video? I thought so. Here's another:
After idling for ~1 minute, that guy has very little fuel in each cup. Did you notice how quickly and easily the engine started at the beginning? That was not a coincidence.

You are looking for consistancy here, not necessarily outright volumes. Searching Google and Youtube for 'Leak off test' should furnish you with all the information and examples you need to carry out this quick, easy, cheap and illuminating test.

If one or more of your injectors fail this test, they require refurbishment (specialist) or replacement. You can buy new or take a punt on a used one from a known-good engine. New or used, it'll likely require coding to your ECU. This can be done in CAN Clip or DDT2000, I believe. A suitably equipped garage or the main dealer can, of course, also do this.



That's the quick, basic list done.
Other faults can and will stop your car from starting, the above are just some common examples for the 1.5 dCi.

I've written all of this in relation to my 2003 Clio dCi 65 engine. I'm sure many are the same/similar but care should be taken with considerably different units (much newer, higher power output etc.) to ensure correct procedure and data.

If there are any Renault-specific glaring errors with any of the above or if you would like to add some more points for owners to check, chime in by all means.

:)
Hi Good inf do you think this can help me.I need to bleed diesel always after stopping the engine for moor than 30 minutes. Do I need to make some electrical changes If I like to change for 2 Captain seats in front Trafic 2006
 

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Looking for some advice - Renault Diesel 2006 DCI.

The car failed towards the start of the covid-19 lockdown with an injector fault, had been driving ok and starting a little sluggishly prior but came up with the injector warning, everything stopped and had to push the car home.

Did a check, found one injector was not working right so bought a refurbished injector and had the code changed and fitted it. Still no start. Can't even get the car to turn over. Looked at everything I can think of but have drawn a blank and dont really want to shell out a lot on an old car if I dont have to (would prefer to replace it at that point).

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Take a look at my story here if you like:Renault Symbol 1.5dci 82CP 2006 Starting Issue, it may be similar.
What I can tell you is that the car starts with only three injectors working (ask me how I know that :)). It just idles a little higher, you get the glow plug light in the dashboard and you can feel the vibration from the engine.
My advice is get an OBD scanner and see what errors are logged in the ECU, or get someone who has one to help you. Also with a good scanner you can see if you have fuel pressure from the pump and other important parameters live.
 

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Hi, Need help with Clio 1.5 dci.

driving along car had a couple of judders then cut out.
Plug into snap on unit and only one fault.
186912


car Towed home and turns over but will not start. Going to get new sensor tomorrow.
Question is would a faulty sensor stop car starting or is there more to it that the snapon can see.

thanks
David
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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With what you describe, first thing I would check is timing..... has the belt shredded or jumped?
 

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The thread is designed for the 1.5 dCi only, I don't have any experience of the petrols!
I've got the 1.5 dci Clio 55plate.
I'm a mechanic but had these issues on the Megan 1.6 petrol no coms ect.
Can you give me any advice , as it just stopped one day, and won't supply power to obd2 plug or even try to turn over...nnif I can manage to get power no coms. What the likely suspect before pull everything apart.? Thanks hope u can help 😃
 

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Super fantastic Mod Technical Supremo Nice Guy
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YOU need to start your own post
This is just for Diesel 1.5 .
Doubt if anyone will help on this thread,..
 

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Hi, I have a 1.5dci in a 2010 Scenic. It has an intermittent starting issue. When you press the start button, nothing happens other than a relay click from the left hand side of the car, the starter motor does not crank (no voltage at the motor), no warnings on the dash and no DTCs read using a generic reader. I replaced the glow plugs as they needed doing and after replacement it started first time, was fine for a day then back to the old problem and car wouldn’t start this morning. No this evening it starts fine. Only think I can find that doesn’t seem right is quite a bit of air in the fuel line after the filter but when it starts, it runs fine with air still there. Grateful for any ideas. Thanks
 
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