Independent Renault Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I’m planning to tackle the cambelt/water pump on my Clio 1.6 K4M 801 (auto). I’ve read that it is a bit challenging, but I like a challenge and have a bit of time on my hands at present...

I can see that there’s quite a few lock tool kits on the market (ebay) - can anyone recommend a specific one? Some look a bit poundland from what I can see.

Is the sprocket holding tool necessary? Some kits contain it, other’s don't.

The car is a 2011 model and this will be its first belt/pump swap.

Thanks
Chris
 

·
Premium Member
Renault Scenic 1.6 L 16V 2002 Petrol
Joined
·
16,739 Posts
loads on fleabay.
All pretty much the same.
around £20.

Should include the u shaped cam locker, the crank locker and a cam locker and another pin.
Don't forget to get the two cam end covers as you will destroy them getting them out.


Cheapest I could see on a quick scan

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
189336


I got a this kit off ebay for about £30. I took my chances with it and it did the job without issue on my megane 1.6VVT.

Few pointers to be aware of. The camshaft, depshaser pulley and crankshaft do not have a keyway and are held by the friction of the nut / bolt.

Torx blank bolt in front of engine can easily round off so be careful with this. Plenty of penetrating oil. Round this off and the bumper and rad will have to come off to get access to the bolt to remove.

Crankshaft bolt will be mega tight. DO NOT USE THE CRANKSHAFT LOCK PIN TO HOLD CRANKSHAFT WHILE UNDOING THIS BOLT. You risk bending the pin.

Timing of the camshaft is at the gearbox side of the engine. Plastic blank plugs need to be stabbed and pried out. Make sure you have replacements in timing belt kit. Cams locked with the 'U' shaped tool with the offset in the downwards position.

The tool to the left in my picture is to set the dephaser pulley in the correct position as this moves freely. It allows the dephaser pulley bolt to be tightened (if replacing dephaser pulley) and also puts the dephaser pulley in correct position for installing belt. Maybe if only installing belt you could use marks copied on to timing belt to determine the dephaser pulley position? I don't know. I used the correct tool.

Do not tighten idle pulley until you have routed timing belt otherwise you will struggle getting it on.

Make sure you change the aux belt too. Check the aux belt tensioner pulley bearings for roughness and play. A failed aux belt can find its way into the timing belt and destroy your engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
loads on fleabay.
All pretty much the same.
around £20.

Should include the u shaped cam locker, the crank locker and a cam locker and another pin.
Don't forget to get the two cam end covers as you will destroy them getting them out.


Cheapest I could see on a quick scan

:)
Thanks KingW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
View attachment 189336

I got a this kit off ebay for about £30. I took my chances with it and it did the job without issue on my megane 1.6VVT.

Few pointers to be aware of. The camshaft, depshaser pulley and crankshaft do not have a keyway and are held by the friction of the nut / bolt.

Torx blank bolt in front of engine can easily round off so be careful with this. Plenty of penetrating oil. Round this off and the bumper and rad will have to come off to get access to the bolt to remove.

Crankshaft bolt will be mega tight. DO NOT USE THE CRANKSHAFT LOCK PIN TO HOLD CRANKSHAFT WHILE UNDOING THIS BOLT. You risk bending the pin.

Timing of the camshaft is at the gearbox side of the engine. Plastic blank plugs need to be stabbed and pried out. Make sure you have replacements in timing belt kit. Cams locked with the 'U' shaped tool with the offset in the downwards position.

The tool to the left in my picture is to set the dephaser pulley in the correct position as this moves freely. It allows the dephaser pulley bolt to be tightened (if replacing dephaser pulley) and also puts the dephaser pulley in correct position for installing belt. Maybe if only installing belt you could use marks copied on to timing belt to determine the dephaser pulley position? I don't know. I used the correct tool.

Do not tighten idle pulley until you have routed timing belt otherwise you will struggle getting it on.

Make sure you change the aux belt too. Check the aux belt tensioner pulley bearings for roughness and play. A failed aux belt can find its way into the timing belt and destroy your engine.
Thanks VanmanPaul

This is all really useful. One of the common themes in the posts I have read about DIY cambelt changing on these engines is that the belt is tricky to get on due to being tightly wound even before the tensioner comes into play. I guess the lip on the edges of the cam sprockets do not help, but the suggestion about the idler pulley makes sense.

From what I understand of the process so far, so long at the crank is stationary against the locking pin and the cam sprockets are locked, then all should be well. Presumably with the idler being slightly loose (not tight) then when you nip it up at the end, any slack in the belt is rotated out of the crank sprocket and then taken in by the tensioner?

I've changed a few belts in my youth (mostly VW and Rover K) but had a nightmare with a Focus timing belt about 15y ago, so have avoided them since. Necessity (Renault want the best part of £1,200 to change belt + WP on my car and local indi garages not massively cheaper) and unfinished business with the Focus have lead me to think that doing this belt is a good idea. Time will tell...

One other question - Roy Haynes says to lock the flywheel by removing a sensor from the top of the bell housing (i forget which). The car is an auto, so foot on the brake method/in gear apparently wont work to lock the crank to remove the bolt. Is there any other way of locking the thing up without disturbing the auto box?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I guess those who said the belt is tightly wound had tightened up the idle pulley and struggled to get belt on.

When the crankshaft web is against the locking pin (front of engine) I recommend locking the flywheel in the ring gear. Being auto you may need to remove starter motor for this. The sensor you mentioned on the top of the bell housing is the crankshaft position sensor. Now remove the timing pin from front of engine. Leaving this timing pin will risk bending it when undoing the crankshaft bolt. It is only to set timing. When the crankshaft bolt is removed, remove the crankshaft pulley. Now put the old bolt back in the crankshaft and nip up. Free the flywheel with which ever method you chose and reinsert your timing pin in front of engine. You can use the crankshaft bolt to make sure the crankshaft web is against the timing pin. When satisfied crank is timed up you can go about removing the belt. I have gone into detail here because as mentioned the crankshaft on these engines don't have a keyway and once bolt undone the crankshaft cannot be turned hence my reason for reinserting the old bolt and checking timing!

Yes put the idle pulley on not forgetting the plastic spacer behind pulley but only turn the bolt enough to hold it in place. Insert the belt in following order:

Crank sprocket
Idle pulley
Dephaser pulley
Exhaust cam sprocket
Tensioner pulley

Now you can tighten idle pulley and make sure the belt sits correctly between the crank sprocket, idle pulley, dephaser and exhaust. There should be no slack and the belt teeth should sit flush with the sprocket grooves. The only slack should be on the tensioner side of the belt.

The crank bolt you reinserted temporarily will have kept the crank sprocket from turning. From memory there should be a notch on this pointing to either 6 or 12 can't remember position however as this sprocket isn't keyed it turns when not bolted to crank. Remember it's position and make a mark. Lock crankshaft and remove timing pin. Bottom timing cover and crankshaft pulley can now be installed and new crankshaft bolt and washer, tightened to correct tightening torque and then angle tightened to correct spec. Unlock flywheel.

This is where I set the timing belt tensioner and nip it enough to hold tension. Remove camshaft locking tool and rotate belt 3 times and then reinsert timing tools to make sure they all line up perfect. Now check timing tensioner is correct and then set final torque on tensioner bolt.

Hope this helps
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
The picture I thought it had deleted. This is showing the camshafts in the offset downwards position when locked with the 'U' shaped tool.
 

·
Premium Member
Renault Scenic 1.6 L 16V 2002 Petrol
Joined
·
16,739 Posts
If you have undone the sprockets from the cams and changed oil seals the end of the cam shafts will have oil on them.
This oil must be cleaned off as there are no key ways on the cam shafts or sprockets. They just rely on the torque to keep position.
Brake cleaner is the best for cleaning off the oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
The picture I thought it had deleted. This is showing the camshafts in the offset downwards position when locked with the 'U' shaped tool.
Cheers - I appreciate the insight. The diagram makes sense.

When I've done twin-cam belts in the past, I've replaced the mounts and run the engine up with the covers off until warm and then checked the tension again before zipping it all up. Do people still do this? Or with modern self adjusting tensioners, is this no longer necessary?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I personally don't do that. I make absolute certain that the timing all aligns again with the locking tools after cranking the engine round 3 times by hand. The timing belt tensioner on the K4M engines is the pointer type that you align with an allen key and tighten with socket at the correct tension. My Mrs Zafira has the self tensioning type tensioner so I know the ones you mean.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top