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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
My van appears to be spewing oil from the lower Sender (if that is the correct name). Is anyone able to advise: the correct name and function and any advice regarding replacement?
Van had been running well during two week tour until hose from Expansion Tank split; engine dangerously over heated as I emerged from Dartford Tunnel and suffered serious pre ignition when I pulled over. No evidence of significant oil leak at that point but I did note some oil blown around the Sump and a slight oil drip that was not normal. I shortened the damaged hose, allowed to cool, toped up with hot water and drove trouble free the six miles home (relieved the Head Gasket had survived) and then noted the significant oil leak. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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I suspect it may be the oil pressure switch ???
If so, a quick look on ebay shows plenty available but seems to be 3-4 differing types.
Have a look at the pictures and see if any match what is fitted.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I suspect it may be the oil pressure switch ???
If so, a quick look on ebay shows plenty available but seems to be 3-4 differing types.
Have a look at the pictures and see if any match what is fitted.
Thank Dancingdad. I have ordered one that looks right but several are similar. Europarts say they have two listed for my van but the pictures appear the same; is it the case that if it looks the same as mine and fits that it will be correct or are there other considerations, ie, pressure reading?
Thanks for sharing your time and experience.
 

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Can you remind us please have you a petrol engine? Did your van overheat whilst in a very long queue for the tunnel (I know its always a nightmare if you are crawling as far back as the M20 junction). Seems you was fortunate to find somewhere to pull over on the other side. Chasing oil leaks can be a challenge at times ... keep on wiping down the engine with rags all over until you find the constant wet area. Also check the tightness of your oil filter and condition of your driveshaft gaiters as these can throw oil about too.
 

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is it the case that if it looks the same as mine and fits that it will be correct or are there other considerations, ie, pressure reading?
AS long as the thread and connections are the same, it should be okay (should)
All that is in them is a spring loaded diaphragm so that if pressure gets low the switch closes and you get an oil pressure warning light come on.
Typically these are very low pressures and act solely as a final (maybe too late) warning.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Can you remind us please have you a petrol engine? Did your van overheat whilst in a very long queue for the tunnel (I know its always a nightmare if you are crawling as far back as the M20 junction). Seems you was fortunate to find somewhere to pull over on the other side. Chasing oil leaks can be a challenge at times ... keep on wiping down the engine with rags all over until you find the constant wet area. Also check the tightness of your oil filter and condition of your driveshaft gaiters as these can throw oil about too.
Thank you Renoir, it’s 2L Petrol; no heavy traffic or delays but overheated as I entered the tunnel due to failed hose at base of the Expansion Tank. The oil loss is from the centre of the Oil Pressure Switch and I purchased one today from Euro Parts for 99p! For my own learning I would be keen to be advised how the, very serious, overheating would cause the switch to start to leak. However, I am very pleased that despite the excessive heat, pre ignition and violent back fires no damage is evident. Again, thanks to this Forum I am on the road😊.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
AS long as the thread and connections are the same, it should be okay (should)
All that is in them is a spring loaded diaphragm so that if pressure gets low the switch closes and you get an oil pressure warning light come on.
Typically these are very low pressures and act solely as a final (maybe too late) warning.
Many thanks DD.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Many thanks DD.
Many thanks DD.
Me again! Happy Sunday all. Well, van is running and seems fine other than the electric fan does not operate. I wonder if this may have been the initial cause of the overheating and split hose or caused by the incident or possibly a coincidence. However, can anyone advise if I could test the fan itself or do I need to test/ replace the temperature switches. I would prefer to not have to run the engine until it boils as a way to test. Thanks in anticipation for any advice.
 

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the easiest way to check the fan is to make sure all the electrics are OFF, you dont want to be sticking you hand anywhere near the fan if it is going to kick into life, then try and turn it with your hand, my Corsa fan didnt work and when I came to test it, it would not move, siezed motor, easy diagnosis for me, if you can spin it, then the plug that connects to the fan, if you remove that, you should only see two wires into that connector, make two flying leads with crocodile clips on that can reach from the battery to the fan connector, put the connectors to your battery and then clip one connector to one of the terminals and then touch the other terminal with last connector, if the fan starts spinning then you know it works, it is then down to the switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Many thanks DD.
Many thanks DD.
Me again! Happy Sunday all. Well, van is running and seems fine other than the electric fan does not operate. I wonder if this may have been the initial cause of the overheating and split hose or caused by the incident or possibly a coincidence. However, can anyone advise if I could test the fan itself or do I need to test/ replace the temperature switches. I would prefer to not have to run the engine until it boils as a way to test. Thanks in anticipation for any advice
the easiest way to check the fan is to make sure all the electrics are OFF, you dont want to be sticking you hand anywhere near the fan if it is going to kick into life, then try and turn it with your hand, my Corsa fan didnt work and when I came to test it, it would not move, siezed motor, easy diagnosis for me, if you can spin it, then the plug that connects to the fan, if you remove that, you should only see two wires into that connector, make two flying leads with crocodile clips on that can reach from the battery to the fan connector, put the connectors to your battery and then clip one connector to one of the terminals and then touch the other terminal with last connector, if the fan starts spinning then you know it works, it is then down to the switch.
Thank you Vapulabis, very helpful; the fan works. I have ordered both switches but wonder if I could also add a manual switch in the cab? My van often seems to run very hot and the fan only cuts in when the gauge is in or just touching Red. Could I splice a Live and Earth into the supply to the fan and run them to an additional switch in the cab? I assume an in-line fuse would be needed.
 

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My van often seems to run very hot and the fan only cuts in when the gauge is in or just touching Red. Could I splice a Live and Earth into the supply to the fan and run them to an additional switch in the cab? I assume an in-line fuse would be needed.
That is about normal on the old Trafic. I've swapped my radiator switch a couple of times but the result is still the same. You should have a relay mounted close to the radiator switch too. Very easy to check if its operational.
OldPlumBob mentioned just the other day about fitting an over-ride switch on the dash for the cooling fan ... he had a simple method. I'll have to have a search for the thread he replied on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Many thanks Renoir, I will read later today. Previously you mentioned a relay close to the switch that I could test; would you be good enough to describe this relay and the test procedure?
 

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The relay on my van is just by the bottom of the radiator, its a small square black box. If you gently lift it out of the holder a small amount you will see the four contacts. Two are positive and two are negative placed opposite each other. With the ignition on (but not with engine running) you can place a multimeter probe onto the contacts. When you join the correct pair together (the low amp trigger circuit) the fan will spring into action if the relay is working.
Alternatively you can remove the relay from the holder and check its function on the bench.
Sorry the above isn't the best description of how to do the test. (you can look up on youtube for a simple visual instruction).
I couldn't find a photo in my library but here's a basic schematic of the relay and fan.

I've just looked at this again as the above isn't quite right, I've overlooked something ... BUT the easiest method is just to switch on ignition .... pull the connector from the radiator thermostatic switch ... bridge the contacts inside the connector (the half on the wires, not the contacts on the switch itself) with a thin probe or thick paperclip .... and the fan will come into action. If it doesn't you either have a faulty relay or a break in the wire/poor terminal, or seized fan motor.. This method works on a stone cold engine as you are bypassing the thermostatic switch unit mounted in the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The relay on my van is just by the bottom of the radiator, its a small square black box. If you gently lift it out of the holder a small amount you will see the four contacts. Two are positive and two are negative placed opposite each other. With the ignition on (but not with engine running) you can place a multimeter probe onto the contacts. When you join the correct pair together (the low amp trigger circuit) the fan will spring into action if the relay is working.
Alternatively you can remove the relay from the holder and check its function on the bench.
Sorry the above isn't the best description of how to do the test. (you can look up on youtube for a simple visual instruction).
I couldn't find a photo in my library but here's a basic schematic of the relay and fan.

I've just looked at this again as the above isn't quite right, I've overlooked something ... BUT the easiest method is just to switch on ignition .... pull the connector from the radiator thermostatic switch ... bridge the contacts inside the connector (the half on the wires, not the contacts on the switch itself) with a thin probe or thick paperclip .... and the fan will come into action. If it doesn't you either have a faulty relay or a break in the wire/poor terminal, or seized fan motor.. This method works on a stone cold engine as you are bypassing the thermostatic switch unit mounted in the radiator.
Thank you again, it seems I have a faulty relay and will order one. I picked up a replacement radiator fan switch; Euro Parts are confident it is the right replacement and it fits but has different connectors. I can adapt my wiring but my original switch does not indicate temperature while the replacement is stamped 92/82o; are you aware if this is correct?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you again, it seems I have a faulty relay and will order one. I picked up a replacement radiator fan switch; Euro Parts are confident it is the right replacement and it fits but has different connectors. I can adapt my wiring but my original switch does not indicate temperature while the replacement is stamped 92/82o; are you aware if this is correct?
The never ending saga! Is anyone able to advise where I can purchase a replacement 30amp relay? I have searched eBay, mr auto and europarts who have nothing listed for my van.
On a second matter; while searching eBay I stumbled upon a radiator fan switch for a Fuego that operates at 88/79o and states it is suitable for my Trafic. The thread is the same and I wonder if you have thoughts as to suitability given that my original is 92/82. As always, any advice appreciated. Thank you.
 

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Gotta piccy of your relay?
Of that age they are usually generic types that would have been readily available at places like Maplins

The slightly lower temp on the new switch may well be advantageous to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Gotta piccy of your relay?
Of that age they are usually generic types that would have been readily available at places like Maplins

The slightly lower temp on the new switch may well be advantageous to you.
Thank you Dancingdad. I think I may have found one on eBay France but can’t yet be sure if it is new or used; it is advertised as new but the photo is of an old one! My original is a MIXO Relias 8, 30amp. K8 76723.
 
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