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Technical Supremo, Platinum Member
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Thank you again, it seems I have a faulty relay and will order one. I picked up a replacement radiator fan switch; Euro Parts are confident it is the right replacement and it fits but has different connectors. I can adapt my wiring but my original switch does not indicate temperature while the replacement is stamped 92/82o; are you aware if this is correct?
I've never looked at the stampings on the swithch. There are two different types of radiator switch .... the profiles of the terminals are a different shape so choose the one with the same shape connector as your van has. I bought mine from Mr Auto.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I've never looked at the stampings on the swithch. There are two different types of radiator switch .... the profiles of the terminals are a different shape so choose the one with the same shape connector as your van has. I bought mine from Mr Auto.
Thank you again for all your help.
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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Discussion Starter #25
Don't forget, your 30A relay can always be replaced with a higher rated beasty.
For instance (and comes with sockets)
Thank you all for your time, knowledge, information and advice. I think it unlikely I would have been able to keep my old van on the road without your support.
 

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Aha! a chance to gossip about temperature control and fans (probably of no interest to anyone but me).
Looking to save fuel on my Volvo 244, the big thermatic fan (noisy bu*ger) was replaced with two smaller electric fans manually operated by a switch on the dash. Never had any problems with overheating in the Australian tropics, even on 40+'c days, but obviously the temp gauge must be checked regularly. Even on hot days, the fans could be left off when moving at anything more than a snails pace because the ram air through the radiator was plenty to keep things at the right temp. Fuel economy improved quite a bit. Not for the faint-hearted though.
Some heavy vehicles came with a fan switch on the dash so you could engage the clutch-driven radiator fan at your leisure. Why companies like Ford, Mack, and Kenworth did this is an interesting question, given that the fan clutch was controlled automatically by temp sensor(s) anyway. These switches were handy when climbing long steep hills though, switching the fan to "on" stopped it from constantly engaging and disengaging as the temp went up and down, and you could switch the fan on when going down hills to aid engine braking. These huge fans suck a lot of power, even from big diesels, and were (maybe still are) part of the engine braking/retarder systems on some Volvo prime-movers.
I guess this is why most modern cars have electric fans - fuel economy. (The fans in my old Laguna rarely come on unless the aircon is on, or we're stuck in traffic).

The lockdown is not all bad - just seen on telly 10 keepers wrestling with a 22 foot python at the Chester zoo, she doesn't want to go to the doctor. And now she's eating her Christmas dinner (it's a 2015 show), a whole raw turkey!
What's that got to do with Renaults? Nothing, and I blame it on the coronavirus.
 

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Technical Supremo, Platinum Member
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I guess this is why most modern cars have electric fans - fuel economy.
Also with engine driven fans the cooling effect was dependent on the revs .... kind of a vicious circle when you're engine was getting a bit too warm.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Don't forget, your 30A relay can always be replaced with a higher rated beasty.
For instance (and comes with sockets)
[/QUOTE
Hello again, I would again appreciate advice; can I simply plug the new relay in as a direct replacement for the old one?
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Hello again, I would appreciate further advice; can I simply plug the new relay in as a direct replacement for the old one or do I need to consider the wiring? Many thanks in anticipation.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Aha! a chance to gossip about temperature control and fans (probably of no interest to anyone but me).
Looking to save fuel on my Volvo 244, the big thermatic fan (noisy bu*ger) was replaced with two smaller electric fans manually operated by a switch on the dash. Never had any problems with overheating in the Australian tropics, even on 40+'c days, but obviously the temp gauge must be checked regularly. Even on hot days, the fans could be left off when moving at anything more than a snails pace because the ram air through the radiator was plenty to keep things at the right temp. Fuel economy improved quite a bit. Not for the faint-hearted though.
Some heavy vehicles came with a fan switch on the dash so you could engage the clutch-driven radiator fan at your leisure. Why companies like Ford, Mack, and Kenworth did this is an interesting question, given that the fan clutch was controlled automatically by temp sensor(s) anyway. These switches were handy when climbing long steep hills though, switching the fan to "on" stopped it from constantly engaging and disengaging as the temp went up and down, and you could switch the fan on when going down hills to aid engine braking. These huge fans suck a lot of power, even from big diesels, and were (maybe still are) part of the engine braking/retarder systems on some Volvo prime-movers.
I guess this is why most modern cars have electric fans - fuel economy. (The fans in my old Laguna rarely come on unless the aircon is on, or we're stuck in traffic).

The lockdown is not all bad - just seen on telly 10 keepers wrestling with a 22 foot python at the Chester zoo, she doesn't want to go to the doctor. And now she's eating her Christmas dinner (it's a 2015 show), a whole raw turkey!
What's that got to do with Renaults? Nothing, and I blame it on the coronavirus.
Well I enjoyed that😊..... thinking of Aussies, 38c in my garden today and still 27c at 21:00....whats that got to do with Renaults? Well my van runs hot. Have a lovely weekend all.
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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Hello again, I would appreciate further advice; can I simply plug the new relay in as a direct replacement for the old one or do I need to consider the wiring? Many thanks in anticipation.
If it is the same socket, should be straight plug in.
But check if any diagrams on side of the relays to confirm
 

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Discussion Starter #32
If it is the same socket, should be straight plug in.
But check if any diagrams on side of the relays to confirm
Thank you Dancingdad. You will all by now have deduced that I am something of a simpleton with regard to these matters and I am not sure how to interpret the information on the relays. The connections are the same configuration on both with the original numbered 1to 5 and the central one, Number 4 unused. The replacement has a diagram with four numbers; 85, 86, 87, 30 that correspond to 1= 30. 2=87, 3=85, 5=86.
I don’t know if the following helps make any sense of this but the replacement came with a wired socket/connector 87 red, 86 white, 30 blue, 85 black.
Apologies if this sounds like the ramblings of a lunatic. And finally; would it be risky to merely plug the new relay in an see what happens?
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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Photos may help, a picture tells a thousand words and all that.
TBH I'm reluctant to say yes or no.
To me it is not an issue but I've bin playing with electrics since I was a teenager.
If the two relays look the same and pins are same configuration, you should be okay.
If they are different, you need to identify the pins for the relay coil....those likely to be the 1 & 2 pins
And the other three are the switch side, one common the other two the switch, normally open and normally closed.
I suspect the normally closed is the unused.
Have you got a test meter?
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Many thanks again, I do have a test meter but only really understand how to measure volts. The replacement relay appears the same as original. The fan runs when attached directly to the battery, thus bypassing the relay and coil, but does not operate when everything is connected, including the new relay, and I disconnect the radiator switch and join the two wires as described by Renoir White. When do that I can hear a buzzing from the relay. What photos might assist? Failing all else perhaps I should seek out an auto electrician, don’t suppose you know one near Brentwood, Essex?
 

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If I felt competent this would no doubt address the issue but regretfully I don’t. I think I will need to find an auto electrician to resolve my immediate problem and then perhaps see if they would wire in an override as you describe. Many thanks for all your help.
The diagram was to help you trace / track the wiring connections to the relay - not just for the switch overide !
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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and I disconnect the radiator switch and join the two wires as described by Renoir White. When do that I can hear a buzzing from the relay.
That's indicative of low power to the relay coil...they simply buzz but don't throw the switch.
Give what you have said, my suspicion would be a bad earth from the switch.
To prove, take a wire direct from the negative pole on the battery to the switch bypass join... if I am right the relay ought to click and the fan run.
If it does, trace the earth lead and clean up the connections... or replace to a decent earth point.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
The diagram was to help you trace / track the wiring connections to the relay - not just for the switch overide !
The diagram was to help you trace / track the wiring connections to the relay - not just for the switch overide !
The diagram was to help you trace / track the wiring connections to the relay - not just for the switch overide !
Thanks OPB, as previously mentioned I am not the brightest button.... only subsequent to my last reply did it dawn on me that your diagram was intended to assist me trace a potential fault, and, precisely as described by Dancingdad, I found a poor earth to the alternator and, to my delight and relief everything is now working. The new Radiator Switch with the lower temperature appears to be an added bonus. Again, many thanks to you all.
 
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