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Hi I have just bought a 2006 Grand Espace and I'd love to upgrade the Alloys but Ive been told that because it is a Grand I cant do this - is this correct?? Please help, thanks:confused:
 

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Hello and welcome to the forum.:)

I can see no reason why the wheels couldn't be changed,as long as you make sure the tyres are the same weight rating there shouldn't be any problems at all.

Who told you that you couldn't change the alloys and what reasons did they give?.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi thanks for responding, I have been told by three Alloy Wheel suppliers. The wheels go on ok but there is some interference with (and you have to excuse me cause this is all abit too technical for me) the gear changes or brake discs some mechanical issue like that. One supplier said he is currently being sued by a customer to whom he fitted alloys to their Grand Espace and due to a serious accident they had their insurance company claim the alloys where to blame. Most likely the usual insurance companies get out clause however, why would everyone I spoke to say alloys are not compatible to the Grand models?? I think I'll stick to the alloys that have came with it. Also to note this only affects the Grand models the normal Espace's are fine.
 

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Also to note this only affects the Grand models the normal Espace's are fine.
The handbook for my standard wheelbase Espace warns not to fit non Renault wheels to the vehicle. It does not give a reason though.

I always assumed it was due to the pressure sensors.
 

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I'd say third party alloy wheels approved and fitted by a professional tyre/wheel specialist would not be the cause of said accident,
and that the insurance company is only dealing lies and utter b:censored: in this case.

If I was a tyre specialist getting sued over this, I'd get my solicitor to battle this out all the way,
thus, forcing the insurance company to provide evidence to substantiate their claims.
 

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I'd say third party alloy wheels approved and fitted by a professional tyre/wheel specialist would not be the cause of said accident,
and that the insurance company is only dealing lies and utter b:censored: in this case.

If I was a tyre specialist getting sued over this, I'd get my solicitor to battle this out all the way,
thus, forcing the insurance company to provide evidence to substantiate their claims.
You assume of course that the fitter has not fitted wheels and tyres against the manufacturers reccomendations. If they have then they would be on very sticky ground.

Badly fitted, worn or poorly matched tyres are major contributions to road accidents, especially those on motorways and other high speed roads.
 

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Diamond dismember
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You assume of course that the fitter has not fitted wheels and tyres against the manufacturers reccomendations. If they have then they would be on very sticky ground.
Exactly. A good tyre fitter would know these things, and I believe the Espace is common enough in the UK,
that most tyre specialists would be aware of any issues in this regard.

Badly fitted, worn or poorly matched tyres are major contributions to road accidents, especially those on motorways and other high speed roads.
I don't disagree with that in anyway, although I don't think all of that is down to the tyre specialist.
A good tyre specialist worth her/his salt will use the right torque when fitting the wheels,
proactively check for uneven or excessive wear, and do a proper matching job when fitting new tyres.

There are, however, a lot of DIY-ers out there who haven't done their homework before setting about,
which is why I see a few wheels fall off every now and then, mostly around Easter and mid-autumn,
when people change from winter to summer tyres and vice versa.

Also, there are cases of people running around on bald tyres, yes.
A common minimum tread depth recommendation is 3 mm on summer tyres, and 5 mm on winter tyres.
 
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