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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I have a very slow puncture since buying the car a couple of months back.
Couldn't find it until today, when I removed the wheel and plonked it into a bath full of water.

There are tiny bubbles coming from 3 or 4 places around the beading on the inside rim.

The tyre looks fairly new, so reluctant to change it.
Do you think having the tyre re-seated might fix the leaks?

The rim looks fine, don't see any obvious damage or buckle.

Thanks for any help.
 

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What is most likely to have occured is that the inside lip of the wheel rim has started to corrode; its no longer smooth edge meeting smooth edge, and air starts leaking.

I've had this myself in the past.

Tyre fitters know how to carry out this pretty straightforward fix.

The tyre needs partially removed from the rim, and a d/a sander run along the inside edge of the wheel rim (inner & outer face), then the tyre re-seated.

It shouldn't need re-balancing, as the tyre's position relative to the wheel is unaltered.

I'd shop around, and get all 4 done, as they will all start doing this sooner or later.

HTH

Paul

P.S. you are very brave putting the wheel into the bath, my OH would kill me!
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, had the wheel in the bath for 5mins and then spent 15mins scrubbing it out before she gets home :d

Would this also apply to alloy wheels? as mine are
 

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It happens to alloys (that's what were on my scorpio).

Aluminium corrodes in a different way from steel, insofar as the area which corrodes is on the surface (bubbles & pitting), but the area directly underneath doesn't corrode any further (whereas steel rusts all the way through, eventually).

Aluminium corrosion travels under the painted surface, pushing paint up as it goes its merry way.

Its probably because a tyre fitter in the past has used a lever to seat or remove a tyre; chipped the surface, and started the ball rolling - think of all the salt/water/heat that a wheel gets exposed to, and its just what happens.

Phone a few places, you will find a big difference in prices - I paid £10 per wheel, around 9 years ago.

Hope you had the Cillit Bang out - my OH would just point something at me, which goes BANG!

Paul
 

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Apart from road salt and debris, dogs pee doesn't do the alloy rims any good either. I could never figure out what fascination dogs have for car wheels.:crazy:

My mate had a similar problem a few years back. He had the tyres removed form the rims - he then wire brushed and sanded around the seal areas and two coats of hammerite and all has been perfect since. Leaving the corroded areas untreated is only likely to encourage further corrosion.:)
 

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Bath shining, she'll be suspicious now :eek:
I'll look out for you on the Jeremy Kyle show - for those 'all important lie-detector results'!:d

Only problem with painting the rims Noel is that the paint needs a few days to fully dry.

And guess what'll happen the next time a tyre gets changed - back to square number 1.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks madnoel10.

Panic over, washed the neighbours cat in the bath and poured the contents of the deep fat fryer into it.

Now looks like I never touched it :d

Just out of curiosity, would washing a cat with Cillit Bang and boiling water cause it to loose it's fur and then lie motionless on the floor?
 

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I think the 'cat' has failed, probably with (cat)astrophic consequences...:d
 
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There is a specific substance to use,surprisingly enough it's called bead seal.:d

All that needs to happen is that the tyre needs to be removed from the wheel (marked to show it's relation to the valve and the position of any weights before hand),then the beads cleaned so they are smooth with an air angle die-grinder fitted with a Scotch Brite pad,then a thin layer of bead seal is put around the beads and the tyre then fitted.The sealer goes off to both protect the exposed areas of alloy and also seal the rim.

A tyre place should charge no more than £10-£15 for each wheel.:)
 
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