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Discussion Starter #1
In my haynes manual it states that the tension of the auxillary drivebelt should be checked with a special tool renault use.
Is there any other way I could check this tension other then taking it to a garage or a main dealer.
It was so simple before by just measureing the amount of movement on the longest part of the belt.
 

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Hi the belts on the cars today have a pre tensioner fitted so when you fit a spanner to the tensioner and pull to-wards you it loosens the belt and vice-versa for putting the belt back on the tool you talk about is to measure the load on the spring on the pre tensioner and if its not a certain tension then its replaced and i would say not that often.Any good tool shop will sell a tool for likes of this but it would only be worth it if you where in the job of mechanicing alot you would also need to know the settings ie how much how little if you know what i mean i hope this help Donald.
 

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Drive belt

Hi - Check if the haynes manual is refering to the cambelt and not the drive belt. Whenchecking thedrive belt ensure it is not too tight as it may damage the alternator.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
hi
It is for the drive belt that goes over the alternator. I agree that too much tension can damage the alternator but its this special tool i need to know about and if there is another way of knowing it is of a correct tension. On my old fiesta, which also has a drive belt tension on it, haynes states that the tension is adjusted on the longest part of the belt so there is a deflection of approx 3mm but for my clio it states a special electronic meter tester which renault use is required to check the tension.
What a bind if I have to renew this auxillary drive belt if I have to got to renaults to get it done.
 

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Hows tights my belt

Hi -I've just had a look through my Haynes manual and they state there should be a deflection of 2.5 to 3.5 milimetres under a force of 30Newtons. The equipment used by renault calaculates this easily. The haynes manual also gives another method. Place a straight edge along the longest section of the belt apply a force of 30N (6-7 lbs) and the deflection should be 2.5 to 3.5mm. They suggest using a spring balance for this purpose. As you can work out either way is a bit complicated. Why not try replacing the belt yourself and then see if you can get it checked - the check might be a lot cheaper than the price of a full fit. Most people get the drive belt replaced at the same time as the cambelt. Ideally the belt should be checked when it's cold. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
madnoel1o
your great, thats the news that I need. It would be lovely not to have to go to renaults just to get it checked as a regular precaution. As I would like to carry out most of the servicing on my car now warranty has run out and hopfully only go to them when the cambelt needs to be changed(don't think I would be up to changing that)
 

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One word of warning - if the drive belt comes adrift it can become entangled in the cambelt resulting in it breaking with resultant serious engine damage which could cost well over a £1000. In my opinion I would get it checked as it would be more cost effective in the long run.:)
 
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