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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How about a thread for your favourite "wouldn't be without" products for your caravan, or any handy tips you want to share?

My first nomination has to be Polymorph. This stuff is brilliant for replacing various bits and pieces that they either (a) don't make anymore or (b) want to charge you £20 for when it's only a fiddling little bit of plastic.

So far, on various caravans, I have used this stuff to repair window stays and blind catches, make a new milk tray hook inside the fridge, replace a whole missing corner (including the hinge pivot) on a plastic bathroom cabinet, and even make a childproof lock for the door catch on our current 'van.

All you do is bung the stuff in hot water (straight from the kettle works fine, just take care not to burn yourself) then mould it into the shape you want and wait for it to cool. It 'sets' with the consistency and strength of nylon.

Polymorph

This stuff has applications elsewhere too, but it really seems to come into its own in the caravan. Keep a tub of it to hand, and the next time you break something plastic, just make a new one :d
 

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polymorph...........looks good,i'll try that.

Here's my can't do without:-

Aquarium Thermometer

stick it on fridge and sensor in fridge then you can see fridge temperature at a glance.

5 degrees is good for chilling beer and keeping chocolate from melting.

:) :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
polymorph...........looks good,i'll try that.

Here's my can't do without:-

Aquarium Thermometer

stick it on fridge and sensor in fridge then you can see fridge temperature at a glance.

5 degrees is good for chilling beer and keeping chocolate from melting.

:) :)
Nice one! I bought a meat thermometer from Maplin and stuck it inside the jacket of the Carver water heater so I could keep tabs on it warming up, but I never thought to put one in the fridge.

Not that our fridge stands a cat in hell's chance of staying at a sensible temperature for any length of time. All of the controls are at the perfect height for The Grizzle to twiddle with them, which of course he does every time our backs are turned.
 

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How about a thread for your favourite "wouldn't be without" products for your caravan, or any handy tips you want to share?

My first nomination has to be Polymorph. This stuff is brilliant for replacing various bits and pieces that they either (a) don't make anymore or (b) want to charge you £20 for when it's only a fiddling little bit of plastic.

So far, on various caravans, I have used this stuff to repair window stays and blind catches, make a new milk tray hook inside the fridge, replace a whole missing corner (including the hinge pivot) on a plastic bathroom cabinet, and even make a childproof lock for the door catch on our current 'van.

All you do is bung the stuff in hot water (straight from the kettle works fine, just take care not to burn yourself) then mould it into the shape you want and wait for it to cool. It 'sets' with the consistency and strength of nylon.

Polymorph

This stuff has applications elsewhere too, but it really seems to come into its own in the caravan. Keep a tub of it to hand, and the next time you break something plastic, just make a new one :d
God can you make a van from this stuff sound superb:d :d lol
 

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polymorph...........looks good,i'll try that.

Here's my can't do without:-

Aquarium Thermometer

stick it on fridge and sensor in fridge then you can see fridge temperature at a glance.

5 degrees is good for chilling beer and keeping chocolate from melting.

:) :)
Glenda 5 degrees for keeping chocolate just the right hardness after towing for about 2hrs for sucking it when arriving on site yum yum yum great tip
 

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Discussion Starter #6
God can you make a van from this stuff sound superb:d :d lol
You could, but if you made a caravan entirely out of plastic, you'd miss out on a vital part of the ownership experience - worrying about damp. Where's the fun in that? :p
 

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You could, but if you made a caravan entirely out of plastic, you'd miss out on a vital part of the ownership experience - worrying about damp. Where's the fun in that? :p
:rofl: I worked on a Swift Challenger last year i took all the roof down from inside and all the wall covering because it had been letting in water,more like sailing i think:d it was the cavity part of the van were the polystyrene is the wood had completely just crumbled in your hands:crazy: but after i had replaced all the joists and new trimming and roof and resealed it it was great its still going around to this day smiling again
 

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Hi again just a little safety tip you probely now this any why but just in case you do not,As you well know caravan tyres always seem to go on forever although the treads are great after 4 years is time to change them as the rubber is starting to break down and a very high risk off a blow out i hope this helps all the best Donald.
 

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Hi again just a little safety tip you probely now this any why but just in case you do not,As you well know caravan tyres always seem to go on forever although the treads are great after 4 years is time to change them as the rubber is starting to break down and a very high risk off a blow out i hope this helps all the best Donald.
Excellent post Donald, I dont have a caravan or tow anything but its a good reminder to those who did not know.

Regards Dave:)
 

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Thanks Hugh and Dave saftey should always be at the front of any thing,There is nothing worse than queuing on the bank holiday Monday to find out when you get to what the problem ahead was and it was a caravan on the other side of the motorway that has had a blow out and everyone is slowing down on the this side to have a look,Those people are worse than train spotters:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: cheers Hugh for the points iam sure i will repay you at some point:) all the best Donald.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I wouldn't say they'd deteriorate that badly in four years. Lots of cars are running round on four year old tyres, and blow-outs don't seem to be that common a problem. I know someone who recently changed his caravan tyres after noticing a bulge in one. This is on a 1995 model that I think was still on its original tyres :crazy:

When it comes to caravan tyres, I'm inclined to change them at the first sign of cracks in the tread pattern or on the sidewall, or at 7 years, whichever comes sooner. Sunlight's the biggest threat, so if you store your 'van in the shade or cover your tyres when parked up, you should get a longer lifespan out of them.

The biggest problem with caravan tyres is that you don't feel the change in ride quality from inside the towing vehicle when a tyre goes flat, so even a straightforward puncture can turn nasty. The real disaster strikes when the tyre leaves the rim, and quite often it does enough damage to turn a simple puncture into an insurance claim. Tyron bands prevent this by making sure that the tyre stays on the rim, even if totally deflated. I'm contemplating putting Tyrons on the current 'van, though I may just get the tyres filled with Ultraseal as a cheap alternative.

I'm thinking maybe we should start a 'towing safety' thread for advice like this, along with stuff about stability issues, towing limits, use of stabilisers etc.
 

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Yep I would agree with both Donald and Horatio here many drivers spend a lot of money and take great care of their car tyres but Caravans/Trailers get just a cursory check over then drive for many miles on a motorway overheating poorly maintained tyres and then wonder why they have problems.


Yes a safety thread is a very good idea for those who are new to towing or contemplating a Caravan/ Trailer .

Regards

Ottoman
 

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Hi again, Horatio brought this up on his last post and this is a big safety thing for me i would not be without my Bulldog 2000 stabilizer for no reason at all, iam completely sure about what iam away to tell you on this as my local caravan dealer told me last year that it is not a legal requirement up here in Scotland to have a stabilizer fitted iam sure that someone will be able to answer this for down south in England and Wales and NI but i feel it should be as this is in my opinion some peace of kit.When i went to my local caravan dealer last year to have the stabilizer adjusted to the new car and caravan he told me that a creaking stabilizer is a bad fitting stabilizer and i am sure you all know what iam talking about this is because the stabilizer had been over tightened putting to much pressure on its friction pads and putting to much undue strain on the stabilizer hope this also helps you all the best Donald.
 

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Despite the fact he drives a Rover :d , my dad has his caravan sort of Mot'd every winter, gets everything checked before he takes it on the road
 

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Despite the fact he drives a Rover :d , my dad has his caravan sort of Mot'd every winter, gets everything checked before he takes it on the road
Very wise man Moi when i had my older van i did it all myself but since ive came up the years and only because its under warranty i got my van its yearly service from who i bought it from which was Kirkcaldy Caravans which is a Lunar and Bailey dealer,there are many people on the roads that do not this it why there are so many accidents with caravans i think.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Stabilisers aren't a legal requirement on any trailer, and opinion is divided over whether they're good or bad. Some argue that they mask the effects of a badly loaded trailer. Others reckon they do what they claim and are worth their weight in gold.

I used the Scott Halley blade that came with the Swift, just because it was there. On a couple of occasions, I genuinely forgot to fit it, and while things didn't feel dangerously unstable, I could certianly feel the extra sway at 60mph.

I towed the ABI once without a stabiliser, and even empty (so it couldn't have been badly laden) it didn't feel stable above 50mph. I bit the bullet and bought an AKS3004 coupling head stabiliser, largely because I was sick of having the blade bracket fitted to the Lag's detachable towbar - it made the detachable bit twice as heavy and a lot more awkward to store. The ABI towed perfectly well once the stabiliser was fitted, and I've never had any stability issues, even when overtaking or being overtaken by coaches and HGV's.

I've stuck the AKS straight on the Bailey and haven't even considered towing it without it. I suppose I could try hitching up and leaving the stabiliser function disengaged, but what's the point?

I suppose it could still be pure placebo effect, but if it is, then I'm happy to keep taking the sugar pills.
 

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I used the Scott Halley blade that came with the Swift, just because it was there. On a couple of occasions, I genuinely forgot to fit it, and while things didn't feel dangerously unstable, I could certianly feel the extra sway at 60mph.
I thought Caravans & Trailers had a speed restriction of 50 MPH ?

What is the average cost of a Stabalizer bar ?


Regards

Ottoman
 

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Stabilisers aren't a legal requirement on any trailer, and opinion is divided over whether they're good or bad. Some argue that they mask the effects of a badly loaded trailer. Others reckon they do what they claim and are worth their weight in gold.

I used the Scott Halley blade that came with the Swift, just because it was there. On a couple of occasions, I genuinely forgot to fit it, and while things didn't feel dangerously unstable, I could certianly feel the extra sway at 60mph.

I towed the ABI once without a stabiliser, and even empty (so it couldn't have been badly laden) it didn't feel stable above 50mph. I bit the bullet and bought an AKS3004 coupling head stabiliser, largely because I was sick of having the blade bracket fitted to the Lag's detachable towbar - it made the detachable bit twice as heavy and a lot more awkward to store. The ABI towed perfectly well once the stabiliser was fitted, and I've never had any stability issues, even when overtaking or being overtaken by coaches and HGV's.

I've stuck the AKS straight on the Bailey and haven't even considered towing it without it. I suppose I could try hitching up and leaving the stabiliser function disengaged, but what's the point?

I suppose it could still be pure placebo effect, but if it is, then I'm happy to keep taking the sugar pills.
Hi Horatio i would thought that my van would of had a Dry stabilizer fitted when i got it but it did not so i have just kept on using my Bulldog 2000 i have used other ones and one of them being the snake master but this was the biggest piece of shi* ever made i believe it had something to do with the metal that is used on the making of it so it got quickly ditched, i got given it when i bought the Eccles so no money wasted there.I got the Bulldog 2000 when i bought the Lunar and i have to say it does do what it says on the tin so it staying.
 
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