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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few questions regarding some trouble I am having with fitting new disc and pads :-
1) Seized guide pin on both sides - I managed to shear 1 when trying to free up - other managed to get out and clean up - certainly moving better - however now have issue of getting sheared pin out of the carrier :(
2) Attempted to push pistons back in using a G clamp - on other cars I have managed to get it pushed back in , however both front sides only compress so far and not enough to allow refit of the caliper over new disc/pads - Is this typical of Clio or is this pointing to an issue with the calipers themselves ?
3) Thought maybe due to hydraulic fluid - so attempted to try and release the bleed screw - what a nightmare of a design - looks like its a 6mm hex but the bleed head is actually wider than this - so unable to get any sockets on it to release - tried plier etc - not got a 6mm spanner - also read that best to use a flare end spanner - any other ideas to free up the bleed screw ?
4) As well as missing a steel pad guide on one side - struggling on other side to get the new pads to locate easily - now thinking I may need new carriers ( excessive rusting) & pad guides - what is the correct name for these guides which fit to the carrier and where can they be purchased ?
5) Are these steel guides really needed or can I just fit the pads to the carrier - might be a bit noisier - would it fail a MOT if they were not fitted ?
6) Now thinking that least stressful & cheapest solution is to try and source used part ( caliper/carrier/ guide pins & steel pad guides ) from a car breaker
 

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Pushing pistons back, open the fluid container and suck some of the fluid out, now it is probably to the top.
If you are talking about thin plates on the back of the new pads, those are to prevent squeek but you can get rid of them, not all cars have them.
For bleeding nipple you would need a special open spanner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Pushing pistons back, open the fluid container and suck some of the fluid out, now it is probably to the top.
If you are talking about thin plates on the back of the new pads, those are to prevent squeek but you can get rid of them, not all cars have them.
For bleeding nipple you would need a special open spanner.
I opened the brake fluid and put protective clothes around to catch any overspill - did not get any - I will try sucking some fluid from container and see if I can get the pistons pushed back in - thx.
The guides I was talking about - found them from carparts4less (eurocarparts) for ~£12 - so that bit sorted + have bought a 6mm spanner just in case I need to revert to this method to prove that the calipers are actually OK ( save me a lot of money if they are OK :) )
 

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Can you get the carrier off
 

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I opened the brake fluid and put protective clothes around to catch any overspill - did not get any - I will try sucking some fluid from container and see if I can get the pistons pushed back in - thx.
The guides I was talking about - found them from carparts4less (eurocarparts) for ~£12 - so that bit sorted + have bought a 6mm spanner just in case I need to revert to this method to prove that the calipers are actually OK ( save me a lot of money if they are OK :) )
If your pads were worn out, pushing both pistons back must bring fluid level to max, at least, and in most cases to the top of container and over it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Yes - got carriers off - no issues with carriers ( per say other than 1 with a sheared guide pin rusted in situ ) - going to take a grinder to ithem tomorrow to clean it up better to get rid of the rust ( enough to get the new pad guides to fit easier & hopefully get the pads and new disc assembled - measured the available distance between piston and caliper forks and definitely need to get piston pushed all the way . If I can get NSF done then just leaves me task of trying to get the sheared pin removed / carrier cleaned / new guide pins .
 

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Can you press the pedal, and send the stuck piston out again.
Now lift the rubber boot going over the piston where it fits into the grove of the piston, ( The part of the piston that is closest to the brake pad, not the other end of the rubber seal where it fits into the caliper ) spray penetrating oil under the seal so it covers the piston.
Now push it back in,
Dont try and force it anymore.
It will go in easy if you bring it back out, spray a penetrating oil under the rubber seal, then push it back in
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Can you press the pedal, and send the stuck piston out again.
Now lift the rubber boot going over the piston where it fits into the grove of the piston, ( The part of the piston that is closest to the brake pad, not the other end of the rubber seal where it fits into the caliper ) spray penetrating oil under the seal so it covers the piston.
Now push it back in,
Dont try and force it anymore.
It will go in easy if you bring it back out, spray a penetrating oil under the rubber seal, then push it back in
When I reassembled OSF wheel - when I pressed the brake pedal it had no initial resistance which then offered up resistance after various foot pumps - made me think that the piston is working to some extent - went to check out the NSF and found the caliper reached a resistance point as per the OSF ( not been back to OSF side to verify that piston did come out - NB left OSF without any pads - so may explain why needed numerous pumps before pedal resistance felt) - so then began to think either I am missing something ( ie need to bleed to remove hydraulic pressure / remove fluid from the brake resevoir) OR I have 2 partially seized calipers - I am now coming to the view that the former is true and caliper are actually OK - so will try suggestions to see if I can get the pistons fully retracted
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My plan is to try and get the NSF completely finished before moving back to OSF to complete after fixing the carrier guide pin issue .
 

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Just press slowly, if you go to fast, the piston gets trapped, and wont go back, Its able to go at an angle to the bore
 

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When you push the pistons in evenly and slowly does it. I've successfully used an oval hammer handle with the hammer head in hand, handle between pistons and twist the hammer slowly.
Well it worked for me...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Now have a 6mm spanner for use somewhere else - managed to get the bleed valve open using a 7mm spanner ( so much for my vernier measure of the nut diameter lol), however even with a bleed kit attached - still unable to get the caliper piston to move completely back - now going to try previous suggestion of squirting WD40 under the rubber bellow to see if this allows it to move back - else looking like used/new calipers are the order of the day to get things moving.
 

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As far as I know, new calipers are expensive.

If you like to get dirty or have a friend who knows some mechanic, you can try taking the caliper apart, clean everything, install new rubber seals and gaiters. There is a set to buy with all you need, bleeding nipple included, really cheap. Job has to be done on both sides.

Procedure: fluid feed line off (special open wrench), secure line from leaking fluid.
Calipers off, bicycle pump to fluid feed hole to push piston out. Take off bleed nipple.
You will see that piston gets very dirty, to the point it stays blocked in the caliper somewhere. Clean everything.
New rubber seal in, apply brake fluid all over it and into the caliper. Piston in, must be covered with brake fluid, use two screwdrivers as a lever to push equally. Gaiter in, bleed nipple in.
Might be easier to install gaiter first, piston through it and then piston into the caliper.
Caliper on, brake fluid line on, tighten everything, bleed that caliper from air.

Repeat on the other side.
 

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you will have to send the piston back out slightly , you wont ever get it press in once its gone at an angle .
put one side back together or clamp the flexi hose, then pump the pedal slowly, you need it to move at least 1/2 inch
the usual way, put two new brake pads inside the caliper, then pump the pedal until it touches them ( Face to face on the pads, so lining are facing each other, not metal to metal )
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Gave up on NSF - back to OSF - when I was pumping pedal previously - piston came out (to the extent that rubber gaiter came off - sprayed WD40 under the rubber gaiter and tried to compress piston back using a G clamp and old pad to ensure even pressure - I think it moved slightly ( managed to re-align the gaiter to the groove on piston) , however still taking far too much pressure to get it to move - I will leave it soaking for a few hours and try again ( removed the brake resevoir cap ) - failing that I will try and open bleed screw and see if it will move easier - failing that I am now becoming resigned to getting 2 TRW calipers from Autodoc along with 2 new carriers - I think my 2006 cliio is now in the last chance saloon - if it fails its MOT for other stuff - next stop will be scrap.
 

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were the brakes sticking before you started.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Possibly - car not been used for a while and rear drum was also seizing - on last MOT there was an advisory about sticking brakes but since only used as a spare car when rest of family's cars out for repair did nothing about it. On OSF the brake pad was down to metal and grating on the disc + also got an ABS light on ( may or may not be related to current disc issues). Either way purchased new discs and pads thinking that the caliper & carrier were still OK - never had issues replacing pads/discs on other cars which makes me think that lack of use has brought about caliper/carrier issues and in turn abnormal pad wear - pads on NSF still had plenty of wear in them despite a seized slide bolt allthough braking performance was marginal and definitely too risky to use on open road.
 

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Possibly - car not been used for a while and rear drum was also seizing - on last MOT there was an advisory about sticking brakes but since only used as a spare car when rest of family's cars out for repair did nothing about it.
Reading through the lot, I suspect there may be old fluid and corrosion in the calipers.
IMO Either new (reconditioned) calipers or as said before, pop the pistons out, clean up and re-seal..... inspect bores closely, if pitted they are FUBAR
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Reading through the lot, I suspect there may be old fluid and corrosion in the calipers.
IMO Either new (reconditioned) calipers or as said before, pop the pistons out, clean up and re-seal..... inspect bores closely, if pitted they are FUBAR
Do not feel confident to strip down etc - so bitten the bullet and ordered 2 calipers + replacement carriers from autoddoc
 
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