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Had a slow puncture on the NSR of my Laguna II and left it in for repair at my local tyre depot - he found 2 punture holes caused by nails and when I went to collect he said did I realise the tyre was being used the wrong way round as it was a uni-directional tyre and he had changed it round whilst doing the repairs. He only charged me £5-00 and when I put it back on the car I found the car ran quite a bit quieter. He also mentioned that modern unidirectional tyres used in the wrong direction where more prone to picking up nails and other debris - causing punctures and access wear. So check your tyres aren't on the wrong way round - backside-foremost as they say.:)
 

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There's also the greater risk of aquaplaning, as the tread design will be diverting surface water into the centre of the contact area (with nowhere for it to go).

The sidewall on a directionally-treaded tyre will have an arrow indicating the correct fitment (i.e. when the arrow is at the 'top', it must point to the front of the car).

Paul:)
 

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Directional tyres are primarily designed to disperse water more efficiently as Paul says.

Some tyres have a tread that is arrowed fowards(directional) and some have assymetrical tread.Once mounted onto a rim,the directional ones can only be fitted to one side of the car,the assymetrical ones can be fitted to either side,but when the tyre is fitted on to the rim it has to have the right sidewall facing outwards(usually marked 'Outside' surprisingly enough!)

A car will fail an MOT if the tyre is on the wrong way round,so it's always worth checking them.Of course,some tyres aren't directional at all and you don't need to worry about them!:)
 

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This is an assymetrical tread....



The tread is not the same accross the tyre(hence assymetrical/not symetrical).The sidewall you can see from the outside of the car has 'OUTER' moulded into it.

Directional tyres are more like tractor tyres with the tread forming arrows.:)
 

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Just as an aside here ...what mileage should one expect from a set of Michelin Pilot Primacy 205/40/16R's as fitted on Lag II 120bhp Privilege 1.9dCi?
 

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Torquey, front-wheel-drive cars (especially with power steering) will wear the front tyres approximately twice as rapidly as the rears. If you don't have pressure sensors, then, these can be swapped (rotated) front to rear, and this will help balance out the wear.

Town driving will also have an impact on the lifespan, as obviously there is more accelerating/braking and turning per mile.

If you get around 15-20,000 miles from the front pair, you are doing well.

Please note that driving style and pressure vigilance will increase or decrease this figure.

Paul:)
 

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Just as an aside here ...what mileage should one expect from a set of Michelin Pilot Primacy 205/40/16R's as fitted on Lag II 120bhp Privilege 1.9dCi?
I don't suppose there's a definitive answer, but if my memory serves me well (and there's no guarantee of that these days) the ones on my 1.9dCi 130 lasted a little over 30K. I've only had them changed once and I'm on just over 50K now. I'd estimate from looking that the fronts still have a good 4mm on them, so 30-35K is probably what I'm getting doing mostly motorway miles.

The fronts do wear faster than the rears, but not as much as I'd expected. By the time the fronts hit 2mm, the rears were getting so close that it made sense to change all four.
 

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I reckon you're fairly accurate there as I have just bought my car with 25K miles on it and it looks to me as if there is somewhere between 5 and 8K left on them. I don't see any great difference between front and rear.
 
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