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Possibly an odd one here: It came up the other day when I took my shoes off while driving (they were hurting) and the wife told me I was breaking the law.

I've heard this from a few sources - that it's illegal to drive in the UK without shoes. Google turns up a couple of results, but when you actually search for 'barefoot' in the text, it aint' there. I've never noticed it mentioned in The Highway Code, let alone ever heard of anyone being prosecuted for it.

I'm starting to wonder if it's pure urban legend. Does anyone know if this 'law' has any basis in fact?
 

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A friend of mine could only drive in her fluffy slippers, but i'm not sure how legal barefoot or even slippers would be?!

I hope you had clean feet, otherwise thats just evil horatio :devil:
 

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Possibly an odd one here: It came up the other day when I took my shoes off while driving (they were hurting) and the wife told me I was breaking the law.

I've heard this from a few sources - that it's illegal to drive in the UK without shoes. Google turns up a couple of results, but when you actually search for 'barefoot' in the text, it aint' there. I've never noticed it mentioned in The Highway Code, let alone ever heard of anyone being prosecuted for it.

I'm starting to wonder if it's pure urban legend. Does anyone know if this 'law' has any basis in fact?

I seem to recall in the distant past about someone getting prosecuted over this, Maybe as you say Horatio an Urban Myth..

Regards

Ottoman
 

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I think the highway code cites 'inappropriate footwear' so whether that means very high heels or clown's shoes (or no shoes at all)- is open to question.

Fundamentally, if what you are wearing is obstructive to driving, and was to cause you to crash or pose a danger to other people, then I think you would be prosecuted - not for what you were (or weren't) wearing, but for the action which drew attention to you.

Its a bit like smoking whilst driving - no-one would advocate doing this, but it isn't a breach of the law in itself. However, if the distraction of this activity caused you to break the law, then its the infringement that's what you'd be prosecuted for.

Paul:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Inappropriate footwear? That would probably explain it. No doubt it's down to the interpretation of a fuzzy, vague, British law being used and abused out of context (as usual.)

The way I see it, if it's 'inappropriate footwear' then surely there must be footwear involved. If there isn't any, then that's like citing inappropriate behaviour when someone hadn't exhibited any behavour at all.

That's not to say that the law wouldn't see it differently, and as a motorist, I'm used to being guilty until proven innocent. Still, given the choice between painful shoes and driving barefoot, I'll probably still drive barefoot.
 

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As Vel said you are probably fine until you cause an accident whether as a result of not wearing shoes or not! Of course the insurance company would be interested too!!

A lot is down to the spacing of your pedals - a clio is smaller than a van for instance; also foot size - mine are size 12....
 

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Cant see a problem with it, can feel the pedals more barefoot, tend to drive like that in summer as feet get hot
 

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I agree with Moi! I have some sandles (open toe) that are veryt comfortable for driving - and don't catch on pedals.

In the summer you can't beat turning the climate control to COLD - blowing at your feet, windows down and sun roof back! I know aircon + open window = waste but it causes less global warming than stinky feet!!:d
 

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Inappropriate footwear? That would probably explain it. No doubt it's down to the interpretation of a fuzzy, vague, British law being used and abused out of context (as usual.)

The way I see it, if it's 'inappropriate footwear' then surely there must be footwear involved. If there isn't any, then that's like citing inappropriate behaviour when someone hadn't exhibited any behavour at all.

That's not to say that the law wouldn't see it differently, and as a motorist, I'm used to being guilty until proven innocent. Still, given the choice between painful shoes and driving barefoot, I'll probably still drive barefoot.
I believe that it is inappropriate footwear, ie. flip flops, or footware that can be caught on or between the pedals that the code refers to. I believe it is ok to drive barefoot.
 

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Its probably safer than driving in heels (do you find this horatio?) :p

Don't know how many time my stiletto heels have got caught between the foot rest and the carpet join - nearly had a few accidents with that one :crazy:
 

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Its probably safer than driving in heels (do you find this horatio?) :p

Don't know how many time my stiletto heels have got caught between the foot rest and the carpet join - nearly had a few accidents with that one :crazy:
:rofl: I do not have this problem sb sb sounds scary ive got this image in my head of a male wearing heels and them being sling backs with open toes on them and a big pair of yellow long toe nails sticking out:( yuk
 

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:rofl: I do not have this problem sb sb sounds scary ive got this image in my head of a male wearing heels and them being sling backs with open toes on them and a big pair of yellow long toe nails sticking out:( yuk
That'd be Horatio on the A55 :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That's slander, that is. My toenails are not yellow, and I always bite them down to a reasonable length.
 
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