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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There seems to be a lot of posts relating to timing belts on the K4M 7** engines, so thought i would knock up a guide on how to do it. Images / diagrams (freely available on the net) are at the end of the thread. freely available but still copy protected, and as such there use is against RF rules

This is just a basic belt change, not a snapped cambelt how to (which will come next!)

I cannot take all the credit, as without people like Recycled Scenic, the task would have taken me a whole lot longer and i would have probably torched the car! :d

The guide is basically step by step, but assumes you know how to use a spanner and have common sense :d

There may be a few bits missing in the tools / parts needed, but i'll add them as they get pointed out or i remember!

Tools

Trolley Jack
Axle Stands
Spanners / sockets
Possibly 'E' Sockets (the ones that look like a torx socket)
Torque wrench
Angle Gauge (or common sense!)
Allen keys / hex bits
Timing pin / camshaft locking set (
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Laser-Engine-Timing-Tool-Set-Renault-3388-/160477254566?pt=UK_Hand_Tools_Equipment&hash=item255d3093a6)
Nut runner / air gun (not strictly needed, but makes things a whole lot easier)

Parts

Timing belt kit - This should contain a belt, new crankshaft bolt, Idler / Guide roller, New tensioner, and the 2 plastic plugs for end of camshaft. Don't be tempted to use anything existing, get new parts!!!
Waterpump - As it is driven by the timing belt, it's silly not to change it.
Antifreeze / coolant.

All the above are available from GSF or Euro. Should be looking at around £100 for a decent quality set.

Getting stuck in

Park the car on level solid ground, loosen wheel nuts on OSF wheel, jack up, remove wheel and put the car on axle stand(s). Obviously chock the wheels and all the other stuff you're supposed to do for safety, with your gloves and goggles on blah blah blah.

Disconnect battery or hide car keys!

Removing the spark plugs will help later on when you're trying to turn the crank.

Remove plastic inner wing for access.

Air filter / intake pipes etc may need removing to access end of camshafts (Right hand side of cylinder head as you look inside)

Remove aux drivebelt. 'Usually' just get a spanner on the tensioner nut, and try tightening it which will slacken of the self adjusting tensioner allowing you to slip the belt off. Some models may have a different tensioner set up, but that's how it was on mine.

Put the trolley jack under the sump of the engine and jack up just enough to take the weight of the engine (then maybe one pump for good luck!) but not enough to lift the whole car.

Undo and remove the engine mount. Remember where the bolts come from as from memory there are 2 different lengths. Once the mount is removed, you'll be able to jack engine up and down, move back and forward to make it easier to get to the bolts etc.

Remove the 2 blanking plugs from the camshafts on the right hand side of the cylinder head. You'll have new ones of these, so a screwdriver through the middle and lever them out.

Next, remove the bolt for the timing pin (numbered 1 in drawing)

Turn the crankshaft CLOCKWISE using the crankshaft pulley bolt until slots in the ends of the camshafts are lined up horizontally (3 in drawing). The slots should be BELOW the top face of the cylinder head.

Put timing pin in the hole where you took bolt from (number 1, shown in drawing 4). If you turn the crank bolt anticlockwise literally 1/16 of a turn, check the timing pin is done up tight, then come back slowly and gently clockwise with the crank bolt, you'll feel the crankshaft hit the timing pin, which is TDC. Doing this heavy handed or too quick, will most likely bend the timing pin, so don't!

Fit the setting bar to the ends of the crankshaft. Hopefully it will slot straight in. Some of them have a little bracket with a slot in so you can bolt it on. If it has, use it.

Next you need to lock off the flywheel so you can undo the crankshaft bolt. If you remove the sensor on the top of the gearbox bellhousing (just under the camshaft locking bar you have just put in) you will be able to jam a screwdriver in the teeth somewhere while someone else undoes the crank bolt. If you have a nut runner / whizzy gun, it'll make life a whole lot easier!

Remove the crankshaft bolt and pulley (drawing 7). If the pulley is rusted on, a few taps with a hammer should 'shock' it loose.

Remove timing belt covers (drawing 8 & 9 )

Slacken tensioner until it moves away from belt.
Remove tensioner nut, tensioner, guide pulley and belt.

The crankshaft (and camshaft) pulleys have no keyway, or anything to lock them in position on the shafts (other than the pressure of the bolts), so don't panic when you see the cog wheel moving about!

Change the waterpump over. Undo bolts, remove old pump, clean up any old gasket, fit new pump with gasket. Job done.

That's the basic stripdown done, now comes the refitting!

Make sure the crankshaft is still up against the locking pin (will need to temporarilly refit the old bolt for ths), and the camshafts are still lined up.

Fit new guide pulley (12) and tighten to 45Nm.

Fit new tensioner pulley (11). There is a metal lug in the rear that needs to line up with a slot in the waterpump (i think...... may be the head but will be apparent if you look) and temporarilly tighten nut to 7Nm (10)

Remove crankshaft sprocket, degrease / clean. Same with crankshaft end, then put sprocket back on.

Starting at the crankshaft sprocket and working anticlockwise, fit the belt making sure it is tight on the non tensioned with no slack.

Clean and fit crankshaft pulley and new bolt. Tighten up until there is 2-3mm between washer and crank pulley.

Slacken tensioer nut, and with an allen key (15), move tensioner until the pointer (13) is at right hand stop (14). This will be approx 8mm past fixed pointer (16) (don't worry, it'll make sense when you do it!)

Tighten tensioner nut (10) temporailly to 7Nm.

This part isn't in haynes or autodata, but just check the tension of the belt between anything with teeth on! (ie camshaft sprockets). If there is a lot of slack in the belt, then undo the inlet camshaft sprocket bolt to take up the slack. A nut spinner / wizzy gun will be needed here or you'll bend your camshaft setting bar!!

Lock the flywheel again and tighten crankshaft bolt to 20 Nm.

Remove timing pin and camshaft locking bar.

Lock the flywheel (for the last time hopefully!) and tighten crank bolt a further 120-150 degrees (just over one third of a turn if you dont have an angle gauge)

Turn the crankshaft through 2 full revolutions, then refit timing pin (4) and camshaft setting bar. If all has gone to plan the pin and bar will slip back into place nicely. If not, try again!!

With timing pin and cam locking bar in place, hold tensioner with a 6mm allen key (15) , loosen nut (10)

Turn tensioner pulley until pointers align (13 & 16)

Tighten tensioner nut (10) to 27Nm

Remove timing pin, and camshaft locking bar. Give the crankshaft another couple of turns clockwise just to be sure.

Fit new blanking plugs to ends of camshafts.

Refit timing covers and put everything else back together.

Don't forget to refill with antifreeze and bleed the system!
 
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Discussion Starter #2
You've been a busy lad Dan I think quite a few people will find this information very useful :)

Don't forget to remove the front offside wheel:)

I have found the cam shaft sprocket retaining nuts can be incredibly tight some times and I've had to resort to using a tube on the end of a 2Ft breaker bar or heat to undo them. I personally think it's best to use a use a tool to stop the cam sprockets turning whilst undoing and tightening. I have made my own tool up but they can be bought
 
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
You've been a busy lad Dan I think quite a few people will find this information very useful :)
Yeah, i just need to get my crayons out and draw some images that are not 'copy protected' so the thread makes sense now :d

EDIT: Attached image is the important one, which has been recreated in autocad to satisfy any copyright infringements.
Lining up the camshaft slots horizontally is self explanitory, and the bolt that needs removing for the timing pin is next to the dipstick tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, i just need to get my crayons out and draw some images that are not 'copy protected' so the thread makes sense now :d

EDIT: Attached image is the important one, which has been recreated in autocad to satisfy any copyright infringements.
Lining up the camshaft slots horizontally is self explanitory, and the bolt that needs removing for the timing pin is next to the dipstick tube.
theres a clever boy, now make sure you don't chew the end of your crayons
 
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Discussion Starter #6
one right, one wrong.

so are you a half ar**d expert too?
 
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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not an expert of anything, just like to share advice and limited skills I've picked up over the years with others who want to learn and save themselves a few quid along the way :d
 

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Spanners / sockets
13mm and 16mm offset ring spanners will be worth their weight in gold for this job. Space for socket spanners is very limited in one or two areas. IMHO don't attempt without !

Possibly 'E' Sockets (the ones that look like a torx
socket)

I think you will only need E14 for this particular job, to remove the crankshaft timing pin plug.
However you will also find E8, E10 and E12 in this engine bay.


Torque wrench

Angle Gauge (or common sense!)

Allen keys / hex bits
A standard 5mm allen key can be used to hold the aux belt tensioner in it's slack position, look for the holes lining up and shove in the key.
Marv
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Well done Marv!

I would edit the post to add that (and change some of the other bits) but it appears i've locked out of it and can't edit it:forehead:
 

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hi guys I just rebuilt and sorted out the head on a k4j engine. I have followed your thread .. good advice here I must say.. just 1 concern of mine is how can I be sure the crank and cams are timed correctly .. I have pinned the block turned it till piston 1 and 4 hit the top. and catch the pin .. I have 2 marks done by a previos owner that where at the top when I took it apart and piston 1 and 4 where at top also so im assuming that my engine was basically set right from th get go .. I fitted the bar in the cam also.. just putting it back together right now but tomorrow I intend to start her up .. I rotated the engine by hand and no contact as far as I can tell but to be safe is there any other way to know for sure.. and if not if I rotate the engine by hand and its safe is it safe to assume I can do it by starter motor just as safe?

thanks guys
 

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Here is a piccy of a home made VVT / Cam pulley holding tool (from Unistrut pieces, as used in Construction industry) The shackles are so one can fit it, set it, then insert a breaker bar when ready to tighten, loosen etc.
For those who need to buy a torque wrench, Machine Mart CHT204 3/8 drive does 1.4 -11 Kg/ Metre (14Nm - 108 Nm approx) Comes with conversion table & plaggy box for £20.39. This range will cover crank & Cam bolts, also head bolts should the cam belt have failed before replacement.
 
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I'm just in the middle of this now and grateful for your posts. Can't seem to find the diagrams though which you said were at the end of the thread. Also I'd be keen to know what is different about doing this with a busted belt which is my case
 

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I'm just in the middle of this now and grateful for your posts. Can't seem to find the diagrams though which you said were at the end of the thread. Also I'd be keen to know what is different about doing this with a busted belt which is my case
The diagrams were edited out of the post due to copyright rules on the forum.

The rules are there to protect the forum and it's owners, sponsors and contributors from action by copyright owners and in so doing, should help the forum stay running in a tickety boo fashion for many years to come.

To keep things neat, I'd be tempted to ask the timing belt question on your main thread.
Things get very messy when multiple threads are running at the same time on one vehicle.

:d:d
 

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Any tips on removing the crankshaft sprocket? I've got the bolt undone but the sprocket seems to be stuck on there pretty tight. Or is it totally neccessary to remove it when changing the belt?

I've tried fitting the new belt starting at the crank and going anti-clockwise but I can't get all of the slack out between the two camshaft sprockets unless I turn one of the cam sprockets slightly (would it be ok to just loosen one of the cam sprockets and not both?)
I noticed when I was fitting the cam locking tool that the shafts were slightly out of line - probably due to a previous mechanic's "tippex line-up" job.

Any ideas what I should do?
 

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You will need:- A serious way of locking the flywheel.
I cheated, drilled a 1/2" hole in the bottom of the bellhousing, to coincide with the starter ring, into which a FAT screwdriver was inserted & held one handed.
At the crank nut, with engine lowered, TWO 10" extensions (to bring it out past the wing), an axle stand to support them, a 24" breaker bar, scaff tube & a 15 stone brat (age 31).
KIN Tight, remember that when refitting.
 
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I've got the crank bolt out already - pretty much did it the way you described except the brat is 36!
My problem is that even with the bolt out, the sprocket is jammed on the taper of the shaft....:crazy:
 

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Morning, now I'm awake, I'll answer what you asked, NOT what I Thought you asked.:(
The crank is not tapered, but parallell, Yes they do stick, yes you must move it, to get the timing accurate.
I achieved this by using the old belt like a strap wrench & by using ally flat bar against the teeth, whilst belting the other end with a BIG hammer.
NB, you must lock the crank @ TDC whilst so doing.
As for your last question, if they did it by tippex, they probably didn't loosen the cam wheels?
I would fit the new belt, set the tension & nip up the crank bolt, turn it over 2 full turns by hand. Then see how far out it is. Then decide which cog, if any, is out.
Should you need to alter a cam cog, then officially, a new stretch bolt should be used.
 
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Got it off eventually....soaked it for a day with wd40 and it started moving today - it was hard to get off the shaft as the end of the shaft must have been mushroomed a bit for some reason, maybe due to the clamping force of the bolt over the years...
What worked best was to hit the teeth of the sprocket with a long bit of timber and a hammer - the shock started to then rotate on the shaft...

Gonna clean it all up new and try to fit the new belt without touching the cam sprockets and see what happens...
 
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