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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone tell me where the Drivers side impact sensor is on a 2003 clio, and once this sensor is activated does it reset itself, or does it always need replacing.

I also cant find the paint code. Any ideas anyone?

Cheers,
Steve
 

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Paint code location

The paint code is either located below the bonnet or or the door pillar (check both sides). Regarding your sensor question - does the car have side air-bags.
 

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Hi there, can't help with the side impact sensor, but regarding the paint codes as suggested you should see a transfer on the drivers door pillar (see pic). The paint code is in the oval part of this and is normally the first set of numbers/letters on the third line from the top.
Regards Leroy
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The paint code is either located below the bonnet or or the door pillar (check both sides). Regarding your sensor question - does the car have side air-bags.


Yeah. It is fitted with airbags in the seat. The drivers side has gone off. I am trying to get a replacement on ebay, but Im concerned that the new one might be acivated if the sensor latches in the triggered position. I dont know how they can be checked.

The alternative is to forget the airbag, but I guess that will cause problems with the airbag monitoring equipment if it isn't present. Maybe I caould bypass it?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi there, can't help with the side impact sensor, but regarding the paint codes as suggested you should see a transfer on the drivers door pillar (see pic). The paint code is in the oval part of this and is normally the first set of numbers/letters on the third line from the top.
Regards Leroy


Thanks Leroy. Renault always did like to hide important info like that. I was a sprayer 20 years ago and paint codes on Renaults was always a pain to find, compared to say a Ford.

Thanks for the info.

Steve
 

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Airbag Replacement

H Circle7, When replacing airbag systems it is vital all components be replaced by a competent and trained technician as airbags are classified as explosive devices and if activated accidently can cause severe injury or death. As a matter of interest what activated the airbag in the first place. The postage and carriage on airbags can be very expensive due to their classification and not all carriers are licensed to transport such items. In the interest of your safety and for the safety of others I strongly recommend that you have any repairs to the airbag system carried out by an authorised dealer.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
H Circle7, When replacing airbag systems it is vital all components be replaced by a competent and trained technician as airbags are classified as explosive devices and if activated accidently can cause severe injury or death. As a matter of interest what activated the airbag in the first place. The postage and carriage on airbags can be very expensive due to their classification and not all carriers are licensed to transport such items. In the interest of your safety and for the safety of others I strongly recommend that you have any repairs to the airbag system carried out by an authorised dealer.:)

To be honest. I didnt know that. The airbag is coming in normal post as far as I am aware. I certainly dont think its classification as an explosive device is widely known, thats for sure. I will be replacing the sensor too, and was going to fit the equipment with the car powered down anyway. I have a friend in a Renault dealership. I think I may have a word with him about fitting it. It was activated by a side swipe on the drivers side.

Thanks for the info,

Steve
 

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One day a postman is going to be seriously injured by a airbag going off accidently as he delivers it!!!:eek:

Technically,if we remove an airbag at work we have to place it in a steel cage whilst it's off the car.This is to prevent anyone getting hurt if the airbag decides to go off.To be honest,the chances of on going off accidently is tiny,but the risk is there.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
One day a postman is going to be seriously injured by a airbag going off accidently as he delivers it!!!:eek:

Technically,if we remove an airbag at work we have to place it in a steel cage whilst it's off the car.This is to prevent anyone getting hurt if the airbag decides to go off.To be honest,the chances of on going off accidently is tiny,but the risk is there.


Surely it takes an electrical charge to detonate an airbag? The likely hood of that happening must be really tiny. I would have thought it more likely my mate bought a round of drinks.;)

Incidently. I noticed something today. No door locks! This is the first Renault I have had, and I realised you can't lock/unlock the door with the key. How do you do that if you have a flat battery? For that matter.. How do you charge the battery if the doors wont open to pull the bonnet release?

Steve
 

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Boom Boom airbags

Hi Circle - yeh it takes an electrical charge to set off most air bag - and they recommend you store them in a container with no exposed metal parts. As airbags are made from a form of nylon and their housing is usually plastic the risk of static electricity increases dramatically - never mind the synthetic overalls and clothing worn by many mechanics. The Health and Safety Executive have a special set of guidance notes set down particularly for this reason. Even the fire services now have special instructions when dealing with cars in accidents. Inadvertent deployment of air bags have been known to kill.:(
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi Circle - yeh it takes an electrical charge to set off most air bag - and they recommend you store them in a container with no exposed metal parts. As airbags are made from a form of nylon and their housing is usually plastic the risk of static electricity increases dramatically - never mind the synthetic overalls and clothing worn by many mechanics. The Health and Safety Executive have a special set of guidance notes set down particularly for this reason. Even the fire services now have special instructions when dealing with cars in accidents. Inadvertent deployment of air bags have been known to kill.:(


It's another world now Noel. I was in the body repair trade for years and left it about 20 years ago. Whilst the nuts and bolts of things have changed very little, the cars themselves have in terms of everything has a sensor of some kind now. Just looking at the seat frame shows it to be far more complex than anything I am used to.

I thought I was out of that game, but having two 20 year olds with cars I find myself doing the spanners again. I have to say I enjoy it, but there is a lot to learn and understand now. I will have a chat with my friend about fitting the airbag. The only thing I dont know is wether the sensor is a one shot device or if it resets after impact. I am getting a new one to be on the safe side. The only thing I have to do now is find where the damn thing is on the car.

Thanks for your information.

Regards,
Steve
 

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Airbag sensors

Actuation systems for airbags can vary - some are centrally controlleed where a single actuator sets them all of at once - others have different sensors located at strategic points of likely impact. If it were mine I would look inside the door which suffered the impact. Yes you are right it is wise to ensure components are replaced with new parts - second hand is not advised as it could have been taken from a scrapper (crashed car)and you've no way of knowing if it would work when required. Additionaly there may also be insurance implications.:)
 
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