Independent Renault Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
239 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all.

Having read many many threads, mostly problem ones, I have a question that maybe could be compiled into a steady growing list.

Assuming this was to apply to the not so mechanical of us, but who are capable of wielding a spanner and such, here is the question.

Other than regular oil changes, filters and alike, that most non skilled people can do with care, what items with regards the engine can be removed, cleaned, maintained etc that can prevent disaster bills.
Eg. EGR Valve, Plugs, any fittings that are simple enough to remove, and can be maintained without great expense
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Sounds like you're already part way there! Everyone has their own opinions on this, so this is my top ten:
1. Get the Haynes manual
2. Change the oil every 9,000 miles and not the 18,000 recommended.
3. Use a petrol/ diesel flush quite regularly.
4. Always use genuine oil filters.
5. Never use supermarket fuel.
6. Check steering and suspension components regularly by jacking up and giving a good pull and a tug. Common areas include rear bushes, suspension strut bearings, the dreaded ball joints, steering joints.
7. Inspect plugs every 9,000 miles - Just remember that these systems run at a very high voltage so disconnect the battery first.
8. Check all electrical systems regularly.
9. Look on here before going to a Renault dealer - there are often really good links/posts and how tos that show you how to do things cheaper.
10. If in doubt, ask!
A friend of mine who worked for Renault and subsequently Peugeot reckons that many problems with diesels in particular are caused by drivers not giving the car, in his words, 'The Governor' i.e. thrashing the pants off of it. He reckoned that half the problems he saw could have been solved with some occasional heavy foot and a good engine additive.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
239 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
So im summary

Check everything and oil change every 6-9k miles
Add a diesel flush once a month
Every now and again floor it to clear out all the crap.

Thats a good start

Now what about things like the EGR, can these and other items that get clocked through general use be removed and cleaned, if so is there a novice guide to this, would someone care to write one, lol.
 

·
Tourerman
Joined
·
4,838 Posts
As GOON says, start off by getting the Haynes Manual !!!!! The Haynes manual already recommends halving the service intervals.

Most servicing and minor repairs are possible with that.

If there is anything you are not sure about don't attempt it, if you can't put the car together again or it won't start it could cost a lot to get it to a garage for repair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Nice and useful thread.
I'd say start with the dialogys, there are detailed instructions on dismantiling and replacement, parts directory, etc.
In fact, with time & the right tools, there's nothing on your car that you cannot repair.
It all depends on how much of your time you want to spare.
Some repairs require expensive equipment that you don't need to buy, like, wheel alignement and ECU diagnostics, and the most useful tool is a two-post lift.
I think however that having a multimeter helps in most cases - by having the proper values for different sensors you can make pretty good diagnostics on some of them, e.g the lambda/oxigen sensor.
However, whatever you do on your car you have to always watch out for your safety - jacking it up, put the spare tyre underneath; touch coils and cables only with gloves, and under no condition dismantle if you have found no advise on how to put it back together.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
40,429 Posts
A multimeter is a great tool,but you need to be able to use it properly to get the best from it.A test light will be more helpfull in most cicumstances,and they are easy to make yourself.All you need is an old bulb holder for a 380 bulb,two fly leads(one for earth,the other for live),and you have a great electrical diagnosis tool.

The most important piece of kit to buy if your attempting your own car maintenance is a decent pair of axle stands.They can save your life.Having a go your self and saving some money is fine,but it's not worth taking risks with safety.Remember to take your time and don't panic when carrying out work,it doesn't matter how long something takes to do,it's getting it right and done safely that matters.If you are in any doubt,then leave it well alone.I am a great believer in the phrase 'A little knowledge is a dangerous thing'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I'd add that a good jack is also imperative. The most useful resource I have is a can of WD40.
 

·
RIP 31-12-2008
Joined
·
5,807 Posts
Just as an afterthought, don't disconnect your battery if you haven't got the code for your radio.
Regards Leroy
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top