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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, this is my first diesel car, 2002 Scenic 1.9dti.

I bought it second user at 33000, I've done nearly 6000 in the last three months as I travel from Glasgow to Perth everyday. It generally does around the 50mpg mark, I'm not the most exciting driver and happily tootle along at 65mph. The A9 isn't a road you want to be reckless on.

In the back of my mind there is something about topping up and checking the oil more regularly with diesels.

Any hints and tips for keeping it running in tip top condition would be most helpful.

I did search the other threads but nothing came up so apologies if I'm missing something.

Cheers.
 

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hi
with nowaday diesels i dont think you need to anymore than usual.i think running out of fuel can be a prob as you need to bleed the system of air(i think).ive ran 2 diesals in the past,a focus and a scenic and ive not had to do anything with checking fluids more often.

the only thing i found with my scenic 1.9dci,was it didnt like supermarket fuels and favoured BP
 

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The only thing I would suggest is making sure that the oil and filter are changed regularly,but that is more for the sake of the turbo rather than the fact that the car is diesel.It's also kinder on the turbo if you wait for the engine to warm before using any hard acceleration and also if you have been on a long journey allow the engine to tick over for a couple of minutes to allow the turbo to cool before switching it off to prevent the oil that goes through the bearing in it to carbonize.

Apart from that,as Nthesx says,modern diesels don't need any more maintenance than a petrol engine.:)
 

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oops sorry lag,how did i forgot about that turbo

sound advice from lagdti

nthesx
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks...

thanks for the advice, I'm usually easy on the acceleration anyway as every penny is a prisioner right now.

When you say change the oil and filter regularly what is 'regular'.

I easily do 500-600 miles a week, mainly motorway and i'm also interested by the bit about supermarket diesel being not as good as BP's own stuff.

I tend to use Tesco garages as they are the best price around here and double bonus of Clubcard points, how sad am i!

What difference would I notice using BP?
 

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Hi there, I also bought my first diesel car just a few months ago. What is referred to as 'regular' is follow the manufacturer's recommendation (as an absolute minimum) when it comes to servicing. However, more frequent fluid & filter changes will do the car no end of good, and will pay dividends in the longer term (if you plan on keeping the car that long). A penny worth of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Regards fuel, in my opinion, I've found that supermarket fuel is perfectly acceptable now & again, but would say that an occasional shot of additives (Millers is a good one) will make its presence known by making the engine a bit smoother, with a more noticeable power delivery (fuel economy also seems to benefit - a major plus point).

The Shell at Cumbernauld (which I think you would probably pass) currently has diesel at 87.9p per litre, which is the same as my local Tesco's. I would wait until the tank is quite low (circa 1/4 full), then brim it, zero your trip recorder/computer and see if there is a difference.

I know the road you travel on, and you are quite right to be cautious.

All the best,

Paul:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
aaah...

you are right, I do pass the Shell at Cumbernauld although I usually dive off before there and use the new Tesco 24hr shop garage as they seem to price match the Shell garage, again the points all add up. I'll investigate the Millers additive, Halfords for a supply?

I tend to leave it until it is on the last notch before filling up, is there any reason not to do this, I've heard it can end up with sludge getting in the system from the bottom of the tank but i do it to keep track of the mpg.

I've even got an exel sheet for it :eek:

Currently do 50mpg, give or take +/- 2mpg.

Talking turbos and caution on the A9, just where I had my accident in november, a month ago, another lorry pulled out in front of me onto the A9. I had enough room to slow down but in the rush to avoid the lorry and trying to pass it with out losing too much speed i dropped down a gear too many and the engine revs lept up rather high, I noticed a big black cloud emitted from the exhaust. I was worried i've done something bad to my turbo but it seems ok since, no smoke on start up etc. What do you think?
 

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Halfords (or your local car accessory shop) will stock a range of products.

You're fine to let it get to the last notch, although in winter, you can get condensation accumulating in the fuel tank, so its fine except in really cold conditions. If you go much lower than that level, you do run the risk of introducing debris into the fuel lines (or running out of fuel itself), so best avoided, if at all possible.

I doubt if you've damaged the turbo as they tend not to be tuned to the max as standard. The engine will have a limiter to prevent damage from over-revving, thus, the turbo is protected also. The black smoke would have been a combination of unburnt fuel from the engine, and any soot (or likewise) from the exhaust. If you are still getting that kind of MPG, your engine is in fine fettle. Although, I wouldn't make a habit of that type of error;) ).

Hope you can make the next Scottish meet, its always good to put names/faces/cars together.

Paul:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
mind at ease

thanks for that, good to know my shoddy driving can't do too much damage.

I saw the meeting date and need to check with my better half, been up since 4am thanks to new bairn so free time is spent sleeping at the moment. So if you see a white 02 Scenic weaving on the A9 you'll be able to put a sleepy face to the name. ;)

Just spied the lengthy list of cars you have, wow. Want another? I think the list is crying out for the addition of a '96 Fiesta Silver Auto with only 25k on the clock. not that I have one sitting doing nothing on my drive. :rolleyes:
 

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I was in your shoes cicra 15 months ago - it does get better!

I used to be a Manager within Ford's UK Customer Service Division, so no ta, I wouldn't want a CTX gearbox'ed car (even if TSB 85/97 had been carried out):rolleyes: .

I'm sure someone will have it though:) .

Enjoy your car, and if I do see you - I won't toot (just in case you're sleeping):d

All the best,

Paul:)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
woah, hang on there, tell me all,

what is a TSB? You're making me worried. My aunt gave me the car as a stop gap until I sorted out the insurance write off, I was hoping to use the sale of the fiesta to help pay for the Scenic. Very worried I'm stuck with a lemon.

She did say it needs warming up or it will stall, only my Dad drove it as the day he brought it up I picked up the Scenic. Felt bad about that but I'd do the same for my kids.

Getting sick sinking feeling right now. Without the work being done what's it worth?
 

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Quality of Diesel-Look at big Big Picture

I live in Northern Ireland where the quality of diesel can vary greatly all the way from the so-called clean burn city diesel to the outright illegal - that's where agricultural diesel is filtered and treated with acid to remove the dyes and additives. - This type of diesel will damage every thing it comes into contact with (fuel tank, pipelines, fuel pump, injectors, etc) - cost of repairs will run into £1000's - where it occurs the vehicle in many cases becomes an uneconomical repair (remeber this is not covered by insurance. The quality of diesel fuel can vary a great deal, it doesn't have to meet the same exacting standards as petrol. Petrol is rated on its octane and lead content whereas diesel is rated on its cetane and sulphur content. You have the right to ask the supplier to provide the technical details about the fuel it sells - if they refuse you can ask the weights and measures dept of your local council for advice. As a general rule of thumb the better the cetane content and the lower the sulphur content of a diesel fuel the better the quality and in return the more MPG - so buying a slighter more expensive fuel may be more cost effective in the long-term. Look at the overall costs of running your car and not just the cost of fuel - which in many cases is the least of your worries when you take into the effects of depreciation and other costs
 

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Discussion Starter #13
cheers, thanks for the info. I'll try a tank or two of the good stuff. i always wondered what city diesel was.

That's raised another question which I'll post on a new thread.
 

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what is a TSB? You're making me worried. My aunt gave me the car as a stop gap until I sorted out the insurance write off, I was hoping to use the sale of the fiesta to help pay for the Scenic. Very worried I'm stuck with a lemon.

She did say it needs warming up or it will stall, only my Dad drove it as the day he brought it up I picked up the Scenic. Felt bad about that but I'd do the same for my kids.

Getting sick sinking feeling right now. Without the work being done what's it worth?
A TSB is a Technical Service Bulletin (usually an in-service modification or advice in relation to correcting a fault). The one I referred to was specifically for any Ford (Escort/Orion/Fiesta) fitted with a CTX (Ford's version of the DAF CVT) automatic gearbox. The problem was (as you describe) stalling when cold or hesitancy. When I was there, I saw numerous cars with faults (most were ex-motability and had only covered 4-7,000 miles per year), yet these cars were on their 3rd or 4th gearbox after less than 40,000 miles (some were even bought-back by Ford and converted to manual). The problem originates in the throttle body, and will over time (the jerkiness & jolting)causes the gearbox to fail completely (the gearbox isn't robust enough).

Personally speaking, I'd get shot of it - make sure its warmed up when people come to view. A new gearbox (which is still some way off) was around £3,000 fitted by a Ford Dealer.

Hope I haven't just scared the bejeezus out of you, but forewarned is forearmed.

Paul:)
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Bum!!

Not what I wanted to hear, good info though. I take it Ford denid any problem but replaced under warranty. I can't really sell it here now :eek:

Unless someone wants it for parts? I'll stick it in the free ads, not good with being economical with the truth and will feel guilty for the person who buys it, if anyone! Do you think £600 is fair considering the problems?

Thanks for your help and honesty.
 

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There's hope yet!

Sorry to have written this news here - it was only afterwards, that I saw you had the car up for sale....:(

Ford did deny any probs (although, importantly - no auto version of the fiesta existed until the current shape model was launched in 2002 - even then, it was a conventional autobox...). There was an extended goodwill programme (which gave some form of dimishing contribution) for cars up to 5 years old.

Personally, I wouldn't have too many qualms selling the car as is - its an 11 year-old car, if its priced at a realistic level, people can't reasonably expect there to be no flaws or wear (or anything imminently 'wrong'). Remember, the price I quoted was for a brand-new gearbox from Ford (reconditioned units are a lot less), so don't be thinking the car's a write-off.

If £600 cars existed that were problem free, none of us would have any need to spend any more than that - the problems are still far enough away for you to sell with a clear conscience. I was only telling you this in case you were going to hang onto it as a 2nd car.

Don't be dismayed.

Apologies again.

Paul:)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
no probs, I really wanted to know what the problem was rather than just quietly passing it on. I'm quite sanguine about it and even nearly gave it away on freecycle.org!

If I can't shift it I can always SORN it, not insured at the moment either, it isn't sitting on a public road. I had temp insurance on it for a while but it ran out and bloomin Tesco want £15 every time I change my details. Having just swapped cars and changed address a few times in the last year it really mounts up and they won't waive it no matter how much you plead.

I'll put a link to this thread on the for sale thread, don't want follk upset with me on this site as I think I'll be around a while. :)
 

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There are rumours that Tesco's fuel is made by Esso although no doubt they use different additives. Have to say that I try to avoid supermarket fuels; we have a nearby Esso that usually sells for the same rate as the Tesco just up the road
 
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