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Nitrogen maintains its pressure much better than air when hot (i.e. driving conditions). I used to have my tyres filled up with nitrogen whenever I had them replaced, but am not bothering with it anymore. It did firm up the ride a bit though.
 
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Well - you learn something new every day. I should have concentrated more at school! Makes sense I suppose. How much would an outfitter charge to do it do you reckon?
 

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It didn't cost me anything extra, although I have a mate who works in the tyreshop, so I may have received a discount or two ;)

Think it's marginal though, if you can find a fitter who does it. I use Merityres in Thame personally, but obviously you need to be local to Bucks for that
 

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No, not worth doing... unless you work the tyres hard (and I mean, really hard), you won't notice any difference using normal air. If you have to check your tyre pressure (you DO check that regularly don't you? ;)) you are most likely using normal air to top up anyway, effectively reducing the amount of nitrogen inside.
 

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We used to have a simialr system at work,and although we eventually had it removed because it wasn't making any money,it did seem to make a difference to tyre life and handling.

As said before,Nitrogen stays far more constant under temperature change meaning that pressures stay the same under most conditions.Our customers who used it were all very positive about the product,although how much of a benefit it gave is very difficult to prove.I wouldn't use it on small/light cars(one of our mechanics used it in his Saxo VTR and very quickly took it again due to the steering being overly light...),but for anything else then I reckon it's worth a go....

We used to charge a couple of quid per tyre,but it cost us more to lease the system than it was bringing in,so it was removed.
 

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This must be b******s surely?

As I sat in the cafe at my local CostCo eating an american piza and diet coke (unlimited refills!) I saw a sign that said (roughly) 'Buy your tyres here and we will fill them with nitrogen for better fuel efficiency, longer tyre life, better handling etc.' I thought "Hold on. Air is already a tad over 78% nitrogen and an un-inflated tyre holds atmospheric air at 14 lbs/sq. inch. So if I inflate it to (for ease of maths) 28 lbs/sq. inch with pure nitrogen I still end up with a tyre with only 89% nitrogen and the rest oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide and the other six gases present in air. How can that possible make any difference?" I know my 1965 grade 3 'O' Level Physics was a long way off or am I missing something? :rolleyes:
 
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Aircraft and Racecars use nitrogen to inflate tyres and have been for years now, there are a number of benefits. It is has a lower expansion rate with temperature, so tyre pressures remain more constant which has obvious benefits to handling and possibly economy. Having said that the temperature differentials seen on a racecar are significantly higher than those seen on a road car. This is probably insignificant for the most of us, if you were that worried about a small change in pressure you would have to start monitoring your tyre/road temperature and adjusting pressure accordingly depending on the type of driving you are doing on the day. Nitrogen contains no moisture, so life of the tyre carcass could be extended, this is could be beneficial to the low mileage users, who keep the same set of tyres for years. Nitrogen has a larger molecule size than the other gasses within Oxygen, therefore it is less likely to leak during normal use, I guess this is beneficial to the cars with those pesky tyre pressure warning lights, and could mean that you needed to adjust your tyre pressures less frequently. Does all this add up to it being worth paying for, well you can draw your own conclusions, personally I would say check your pressures regularly and keep them to the setting recommended by the manufacturer.
 

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No argument with the theory ..........

.. at all (though the statement about molecule size is stretching it a bit). My point is that for Joe Average the chances of having a tyre which contained ONLY nitrogen are as high as six numbers coming up so to suggest that adding nitrogen to a standard car tyre is of any benefit is nonsense and just a big con and way of extracting hard earned money from him. In other words it makes no logical sense. How many tyre fitters have a nirogen pure environement - what!!!!
 
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.. at all (though the statement about molecule size is stretching it a bit). My point is that for Joe Average the chances of having a tyre which contained ONLY nitrogen are as high as six numbers coming up so to suggest that adding nitrogen to a standard car tyre is of any benefit is nonsense and just a big con and way of extracting hard earned money from him. In other words it makes no logical sense. How many tyre fitters have a nirogen pure environement - what!!!!
You misunderstand me, I agree with you...
Although the molocule bit is factual:d
 

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Very interesting Pat - and technical too. I used to work at repairing air compressors in garages, etc and when I seen the amount of water in the systems I couldn't help wonder what affect it would have on tyres. The owners wouldn't even bother to drain the water separators even when fitted. The expansion rates of air with a high humidity content is significantly different than that of a pure dry gas. In my eperience most tyre compression equipment doesn't even have decent water separators fitted. The main advantage of a dry gas would be that tyre presures would be less prone to changes in pressure when there are changes in either the tyre or ambient temperature. For it to have a good effect the tyre needs to be purged of air first. I can fully understand the need to use nitrogen on aircraft as their tyres can be subjected to fast changes in ambient temperature and humidity - antything from - 40C - to + 40C sometimes within minutes.:)
 

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It does work,I've seen it with my own eyes over a period of a couple of years.

As I said,the system we had was removed due to low demand,but the customers that used all said that it was of benefit,especially for keeping the pressures constant.I have seen tyres using this keep their pressure for 12 months+!.:)

You had to be a little careful what cars you used it in though as we had problems with small,light cars being very skittish.....
 
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It does work,I've seen it with my own eyes over a period of a couple of years.

As I said,the system we had was removed due to low demand,but the customers that used all said that it was of benefit,especially for keeping the pressures constant.I have seen tyres using this keep their pressure for 12 months+!.:)

You had to be a little careful what cars you used it in though as we had problems with small,light cars being very skittish.....

Lag, how much did you charge per tyre?

I would imagine that the skittish behavior was something to do with compression values. Nitrogen, doesn't compress as easily as air, you would need to lower the pressure to keep complience in the tyre which is probably more important for handling. I would say that info should come with the system, or from the tyre manufacturer.
 

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I THINK we used to charge a pound a tyre,plus VAT.

It was costing more a month to maintain than we were earning,so unfortunately it had to go.Just for the record,we had a Uniflate system.:)
 
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I THINK we used to charge a pound a tyre,plus VAT.

It was costing more a month to maintain than we were earning,so unfortunately it had to go.Just for the record,we had a Uniflate system.:)
Actually, that's not too bad considering most petrol stations charge to use air now. Still a bit to much hassle though
 
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Very interesting Pat - and technical too. I used to work at repairing air compressors in garages, etc and when I seen the amount of water in the systems I couldn't help wonder what affect it would have on tyres. The owners wouldn't even bother to drain the water separators even when fitted. The expansion rates of air with a high humidity content is significantly different than that of a pure dry gas. In my eperience most tyre compression equipment doesn't even have decent water separators fitted. The main advantage of a dry gas would be that tyre presures would be less prone to changes in pressure when there are changes in either the tyre or ambient temperature. For it to have a good effect the tyre needs to be purged of air first. I can fully understand the need to use nitrogen on aircraft as their tyres can be subjected to fast changes in ambient temperature and humidity - antything from - 40C - to + 40C sometimes within minutes.:)
Cheers Noel.

It's a little worrying that some of the people that maintain our cars can’t maintain the equipment that generates their livelihood. Before all the vehicle techs on the list come back at me I said some.
 

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I must admit,the system we had ran off the compressor but had it's own sealed box of tricks.I'm not sure what was in there,but I suspect there were some very thirsty Pixie's in there drinking all the mositure from the air.:d

That's what I think anyway!.:rolleyes:
 
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I must admit,the system we had ran off the compressor but had it's own sealed box of tricks.I'm not sure what was in there,but I suspect there were some very thirsty Pixie's in there drinking all the mositure from the air.:d

That's what I think anyway!.:rolleyes:
Most of these systems take compressed air and pass it through a series of carbon filters. A membrane then separates the Nitrogen from the other gasses. They aren’t so keen on damp air though, so you should have had a good separator or preferably a dryer in line. What I think Noel was really referring to was the amount of water than can be generated in a compressor, if it's not maintained properly that water gets in the tyres........
 
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