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Still a Petrolhead but also like diesel
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
See here .... after an accident (not just fatalities) it is proposed to allow the police to check your mobile phone records.

Cops may check crash drivers' mobile records | The Register


About time they got tough :crazy: ... this and the new fines mentioned in another thread for hand helds is progress in my book.

Why is it expensive cars and rep mobiles that appear to be the worst offenders (my opinion) .... if you must get a hands free kit .... they dont cost that much and it means you can have both hands on the wheel ..... if you can pay for the car, then you can pay for the phone kit :p .....
 

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See here .... after an accident (not just fatalities) it is proposed to allow the police to check your mobile phone records.

Cops may check crash drivers' mobile records | The Register


About time they got tough :crazy: ... this and the new fines mentioned in another thread for hand helds is progress in my book.

Why is it expensive cars and rep mobiles that appear to be the worst offenders (my opinion) .... if you must get a hands free kit .... they dont cost that much and it means you can have both hands on the wheel ..... if you can pay for the car, then you can pay for the phone kit :p .....
I too am still seeing far too many idiots driving along with a phone clasped to their ear, and I really do hope these people get hit with fines and points left, right and centre. What worries me about the new proposals is that even responsible hands-free mobile use will result in the blame automatically landing on the driver if their phone records show that they were on a call at the time.

The next step will be a load of statistics that 'prove' how dangerous even hands-free mobile use is. And of course if they assume by default that any accident involving mobile phone use was caused by the conversation, those stats may prove pretty compelling.

The next thing you know, there'll be an outright ban on mobiles while driving. For those of us who can't do our jobs without, we'll end up breaking the law and probably not even bothering to use hands-free. Personally, if this law comes into effect, I'll be swapping my works mobile for a 'Pay as you Go' that I won't be registering in my name :p
 

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Whilst I totally agree with you, however if for example there is another person in the vehicle it could be argued that the 2nd person was using the phone. If my wife was with me for example, she would be the one using it and not me as the driver. I think that this would be very difficult or impossible for the police to prove otherwise. In the case of a single driver in the car then yes the fact that the phone was used by the driver could be proved.:(
 

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Still a Petrolhead but also like diesel
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Discussion Starter #4
What worries me about the new proposals is that even responsible hands-free mobile use will result in the blame automatically landing on the driver if their phone records show that they were on a call at the time.
Good point Horatio .... maybe there should be a total ban when driving ... cant see it working though.

Personally I also cant see much difference in having a handsfree discussion and talking to your passenger ... but a phone user will get made the scapegoat regardless of blame I fear .... the next 6 mths or so will be interesting.

:)
 

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Good point Horatio .... maybe there should be a total ban when driving ... cant see it working though.

Personally I also cant see much difference in having a handsfree discussion and talking to your passenger ... but a phone user will get made the scapegoat regardless of blame I fear .... the next 6 mths or so will be interesting.

:)
From personal experience, I know mobile phone conversations can be distracting. It really depends on the conversation. If someone's just chatting or arranging a meeting then that's one thing. If they're asking you to concentrate on a problem and work out a solution, then that requires a lot more concentration. I've never had a near miss while on the phone, but I've come close to missing my motorway exit, and once found myself on a roundabout with no idea of which exit I was supposed to be taking. I also missed spotting an obvious speed camera on the A13 a few months back because I was talking on the phone. I'm not disputing the fact that it's distracting.

But I for one really couldn't do my job anything like as efficiently without one. I can't afford to be out of touch if I'm on the road all day, which I often am. I can still recall the incident that prompted me to get my first mobile. I'd just installed some new software at a site, run what I thought were the necessary tests, checked that it was up and running fine and then left. An hour later, I got home, only to discover that they'd found a serious problem with it five minutes after I left. I had to turn around and go back. If I'd had a mobile, that problem would have cost me ten minutes. As it was, it cost me two hours.
 

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Mobile phone

Hi - I don't believe a driver could be convicted on the records of using his phone -but could be used to support evidence provided by a witness - like the poor driver or pedestrian (or cop) who has been clobbered by some dimwhit who insists ot phoning whilst driving. In this case I think it would be accepted. I know of an instance where a driver was sitting a traffic lights minding his own business -then wham - he looked in his rear view mirror and yeh the person who slammed into him had the phone jammmed under their chin (no wonder he couldn't see where he was going - DOH!!). When police arrived on the scene the injured party clearly stated to the police the other driver was seen using his phone - but guess what the other driver denied doing so. In this case it was one persons word against the other - so you could see phone records would have supported the evidence in this evidence. Talking on a phone whilst driving is nowhere the same as holding a converstaion with a passenger. Passengers in the car are fully aware of what is going on at the time and would realise if the driver either stopped taliking or ignored them - the person on the other end of the phone wouldn't be aware of what is going on. Would you like to be in a airplane if the pilot was on the phone discussing his love-life during landing -I think NOT - (I hear you say). Recently I was with a driver who insisted in using her phone whilst driving and in all honesty I never heard as much unnecessary drivel be discussed (new make-up and colour of lipstick was the tone of the converstaion). I spoke to the owner of a small local delivery company and asked him did he supply his drivers with phones and hand-free kits and he said "Of course how else could I do business - I asked if his business or delivery times had improved as a result and guess what "No". He went on to explain that prior to mobile phones - his staff had to plan their daily work schedules but when the holy mobile arrived - they could just faff about and tended to chap and change as they went So I don't think the mobile phone hasn't really improved our daily lives as much as we think it has.
 

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Tourerman
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Using Mobile phones whilst driving is just as dangerous whether they are handheld or not.

How many people do you see driving one handed anyway? some leave their hand on the gear lever, some find it necessary to hold the roof on.

It is not the holding of a phone that is dangerous it is the concentration on talking on the phone instead of concentrating on driving the car.

The government have will not admit it is dangerous to drive whilst using hands free as the police cannot stop every car that apparently has someone talking to themselves in it.

As for talking to passengers that is completely different, like madnoel, I stop listening or talking to passengers when I need to concentrate more.

The new law is only half way to lessening life threatening crashes
 

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It is not the holding of a phone that is dangerous..... .
Is it not davesss! What if you need to take evasive action but only have one hand on the wheel?

Not getting at you just stating a fact! I mean I never drive whilst using my phone, if it rings they can wait, but I have been guilty of driving one handed most of the time and I can only assume that this is dangerous as I do not have 'full' control of the vehicle:crazy:

:d

Too add....just the other day, I was driving past a lorry on a two lane road coming up to traffic signals and the driver of the lorry, who was on the phone, swerved to my side of the road making me swerve onto the otherside of the road. Luckily there was nothing coming the otherway otherwise I imagine I wouldn't be typing this now!

I agree with the new laws re use of a mobile whilst driving. It's about high time they severely punished this crime.
 

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I think it's clear that using a hands-free mobile phone is safer than using a handheld one. The issue is whether or not the simple act of taking a phone call is distracting enough to cause a safety issue in itself.

I've already given examples of how my awareness of my surroundings has been compromised by driving and holding an 'involved' phone conversation at the same time. I'm a great believer that having certain kinds of conversation is indeed a significant distraction. I'd say it's also a given that it makes me less aware of potential hazards on the road - if I'm not spotting speed cameras, then I'm probably missing that car that might be about to jump out of a side turning.

What I don't think it affects is my ability to respond to an emergency situation should it present itself. I have had to react to driving emergencies while on the phone before now, and my instant reflex reaction is to give my full attention to the situation on the road.

So if there's a problem, it's with my ability to assess potential hazards and adapt my driving before they turn into emergencies. But as I see it, if a car pulls out of a side turning in front of me or a pedestrian just steps out into the road without looking, the accident is still their fault. I don't want to be held responsible just because I happened to be in the middle of a telephone conversation, even if it could be argued that the accident wouldn't have occurred if I hadn't been on the phone.
 

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Mobile Phones

Yeh see what your trying to say but it sounds like a lame excuse for using a phone whilst driving - your reasoning appears to be somewhat flawed - if it reduces your ability to perceive hazards then it must affect your abilty to respond - if you don't see it - you can't respond to it. Safe driving is not just about being able to react to a situation its about perceiving any given situation and the abilty to read the road ahead. Ask any professional driver - preferably someone from Formula 1 who makes a living from it.:rolleyes:
 

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:rofl: Yeh good comment Ottoman - and in my view you can add eating, drinking, shaving, applying make-up. Spotted a girl I know the other week who was driving throught traffic lights, lipstick in one hand mobile in the other and 2 screaming kids in the back. Later when I tackled her about - her answer was "See you men - don't you know women can multitask" It was the best laugh I've had in ages.:rofl:
 

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Yeh see what your trying to say but it sounds like a lame excuse for using a phone whilst driving - your reasoning appears to be somewhat flawed - if it reduces your ability to perceive hazards then it must affect your abilty to respond - if you don't see it - you can't respond to it. Safe driving is not just about being able to react to a situation its about perceiving any given situation and the abilty to read the road ahead. Ask any professional driver - preferably someone from Formula 1 who makes a living from it.:rolleyes:
Exactly my point. I'm not saying that using the phone while driving is safe and I'm only defending it on the basis that it's a practical necessity in this day and age. I believe that it doesn't affect my ability to respond to an emergency, but it does affect my ability to predict one. That in itself makes me less safe when I'm on the phone than when I'm off it, though it still takes either a freak event or someone else's stupidity to turn that into an accident.

I could pretend I'm the perfect driver, that I have 100% concentration for 100% of the time, but to be honest, I gave up on all that crap when I left Usenet. I accept that I'm just Mr Average behind the wheel. I know there are better drivers, but I also know from experience that there are much, much worse.
 
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