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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all!

I am waiting on delivery of new brakes discs both front and rear, plus new brake pads for the rear. I have the 2012 Megane Mk3 1.5 DCi 110 and have been struggling to find any torque values for the work I'm due to carry out (I have found values for the Coupe which I assume are similar, but I'd rather know for certain if possible). Can anybody help me out with these?

Also, whereas I have experience in aircraft maintenance, this is the first time I've carried out anything on a car barring changing wheels and headlight bulbs. As far as I'm aware the process is:
1) Remove caliper from mounting bracket (making sure to support its weight so that it doesn't hang from brake fluid hose)
2) Remove mounting bracket
3) Remove disc
4) Fit new disc
5) Fit mounting bracket
6) Open caliper bleed valve with some hose attached then push back caliper (using rewind tool for rear), then close bleed valve
7) Fit new pads
8) Fit caliper
9) Top up brake fluid.

Do any adjustments need to be made to the process or is there any extra information I should be aware of?

Thank you all in advance!
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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22,773 Posts
That's about the size of it.
Pump brakes forward after refitting and before trying handbrake.
And after refitting the road wheels, not before. Don't think there is an issue on the Meg but does no harm.
The brakes may need bleeding afterwards,,,should not but may.
The hose on the bleed nipples...into a jar to collect waste fluid.

Details that should not be forgotten.
Make sure you have a good fitting hex socket or ring spanner for the bleed nipples, very easy to round them off.
New pads often need a little tickling with a file, to remove blobs of paint or burrs on the steel backplates.
Does no harm to chamfer the leading edge of the friction material a little.
Clean the calipers, brake cleaner helps.
A little WD40 squirted inside the caliper piston gaiter helps push back.
Grease the slide pins and make sure moving smoothly without play.
Hi temp grease.
Renew slide pin gaiters if needed.
Don't forget the shims, check what was fitted as you remove them.
Caliper bolts should have thread lock applied when refitting.
If discs are held with little countersunk crossheads, these can be a pain.... an old fashioned "smack it with an 'ammer" impact driver helps..... you can also give the old discs a right good smack with an 'ammer as close to the pins as possible and inline with them..can loosen the pins enough. Only if replacing the discs.
If discs include hub bearing, buy the discs with prefitted bearings... and the torque is lots....
On a 2000 meg estate was Front 250NM, rear 175NM.
An electric or air impact gun helps undo..... or a length of scaffold bar.

Can't help with torques, I'm a little cavalier on things like brake calipers, two grunts for caliper mount to hub, one grunt for caliper to slide pins (a grunt being a good push or pull on a 12" ratchet, two grunts, push harder with an extra grunt for luck)
 

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Super fantastic Mod Technical Supremo Nice Guy
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Rear carrier to hub = 80 nm
Brake bleed nipple = 11 nm
Rear caliper to carrier slider pins = 35 nm
Rear Hub nut = 220 nm

Front carrier to hub = 105 nm
Brake bleed nipple = 10 nm
Front caliper to carrier = 27 nm
Front flexi to caliper = 14 nm
@Dancingdad has covered everything else for you
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Perfect. Thank you both! I've seen it mentioned to put a little grease on the back of the pad itself as well, is this a good idea?
Also, have you guys come across many people with corrosion problems and if so do you know of any helpful fixes? I need to replace both rear shock absorbers and two sections of brake pipe due to corrosion (a problem for another day), and it's also the reason why I'm having to change the brakes.
Further to that, any electrical fault finding experience would be very helpful. When I double lock my car, the windows usually close, but on occasion they open instead. And I also get an intermittent battery charging error, I've been told it could possibly be down to the alternator regulator but that hasn't been confirmed.

Yes, my car is falling apart 🙈

Thank you again for the help!
 

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Super Moderator Technical Supremo Platinum Member
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Jury is out on grease (hi temp, summat like copperslip) on back of pads.
It's something I've done when I've had squeaky brakes (along with cleaning pads and calipers) but gave up doing it as a matter of course years back.
I've seen reports that it can promote squealing though not come across that personally.
I'm sure others will say that you must grease the backs.
Pays your money, takes your choice.

When you come to sorting the other bits out, start new threads on them and we will/can point you in the right direction.

Must admit, corroded brake pipes...that is not something I would be leaving for another day.
But would I be right in thinking MOT advisory so a bit of surface corrosion ?
If so and you plan on leaving them for a while, get underneath when doing the brakes, clean off the surfaces (wire brush or emery cloth) and paint them with a decent rust converter. Then grease them.
If the corrosion is at the stage where you can visibly see that the pipe surface is bulging, don't wait, next step is failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah it was an MOT advisory but it wasn't the clearest as to which sections so I shall have to get under there with a torch.
I will have a search on here to see if anybody else has started the thread first, and if not start them myself. Grow the encyclopedia for the benefit of all :)
 
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