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Discussion Starter #1
Ok folks, here follows a tutorial on replacing the rear brake pads on a Scenic II fitted with the automatic handbrake.

To ensure the handbrake is off when the car is switched off, pull the handbrake lever and push the centre button as you switch the car off. Then remove the keycard from the dash. The “handbrake disengaged” alarm will sound, but will stop after a few moments.

As we'll be pushing the pistons back into the calipers there is a chance you might spill some brake fluid from the reservoir unless you remove the cap to allow the fluid back.
Pics 1, 2 & 3 show the engine cover in place and removed & how to gain access to the reservoir.




Jack up the rear of the car and remove the wheel centre cap to gain access to the wheel nuts. Remove the wheel and you're confronted with the brake disc & caliper assembly ( Pics 4 & 5 )



Loosen then remove the top and bottom caliper bolts then remove the caliper ( pic 6 )


You'll then be left with the carrier part of the caliper and the pads ( pic 7 )


Remove the pads and small metal clips ( pics 8, 9 & 10 show the bits removed and a comparison between old and new pads)




Fit the new pads and clips - remembering to copaslip any areas where the pads come in contact with the clips. I tried to turn the piston ( clockwise ) back into the caliper but in the end had to borrow a special tool from a local garage to do the job ( pics 11, 12, 13 & 14 )



Then refit the outer part of the caliper & remember to tighten both bolts ( pics 15, 16 & 17 )


Before you replace the wheel remember to pump the brake pedal until you feel the pedal as it was before you started - unless you have a morbid desire to crash your car !
Only after you’ve done this can you operate the handbrake.


Lower the car to the floor then do the same on the opposite side :d If you're only doing the rear brakes, check the level in the reservoir and top up with Dot 4 fluid if needed, then replace the cap and the engine cover.
 

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Another great post Gonescenile.

I would give you more Rep points if I could...


So no need to pop the lever in the boot ( handbrake release ) .

They do look very worn as opposed to your fronts, I presume they must have been binding for some time ? but the discs do not show signs of binding ? rusty yes .


Regards

Ottoman
 

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Very good post and excellent pics, very useful.
Regards Leroy
 

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Another great post !! Thanks for the info on the mileage you got from the pads, my Scenic just turned 20000 miles. How much were the front and rear pads out of interest ? Regards Damian. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks again Gents :eek:

John, no need to pop the lever in the boot ;) I too was quite surprised the discs showed no serious damage due to the brakes binding & I had to use a small hammer and a screwdriver to get the pads out of the calipers due to all the [email protected] that had built up around them. Funny thing is though, every time I washed the car I gave the rear brakes a bloomin' good blast with the jet wash. I thought that should've got rid of all the [email protected] Obviously not eh ! I reckon as there was no copaslip used when the car was built, this was the root cause of the pads seizing.

Thanks Leroy.

Damian, I'll check the receipt tomorrow and let you know. I did get a discount though, as I know the storeman ;)
 
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Great post!

Just few notes to add:

1. Caliper bolts are not be reused, probably in your brake pad replacement set there are new ones. Thread locker is to be used.

2. When removing inspect the rubber seals of bolts, and replace if damaged.

3. Brake caliper piston can be pushed back also by: hand by bleeding the brake circuit from the bleeding screw next to the piston itself, or if you don't want to sacrifice any brake fluid and you don't have the "special tool" just use adjustable wood clamp with screw handle and push back the piston

And one piece of advise - do not turn the piston - that damages the seals.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok ......

1 - The new pads came supplied with onlt 2 new bolts, not 4. Yes I did apply threadlock to the old bolts.

2 - All seals were inspected and found to be in good condition.

3 - These pisrons require to be wound clockwise as they're pushed back in. This "rewinds" the handbrake mechanism within the caliper. The Blue Point special tool used, has two lugs on the end piece that locate into the piston and turn it as the piston returns.

I am an ex-time served mechanic and worked in the trade for over 9 years. This was the first time I'd done a set of pads on the Scenic, and before I even attempted the job I had asked a Renault Tech of there was anything specific I had to look out for when doing this job. His only remark was that the piston had to be wound back into the caliper and not just pushed back. I didn't want to take the chance on wrecking the calipers, so I did as he suggested.
No doubt there are cars who's rear caliper pistons can be just pushed back, but this isn't one of them.
On a slightly different note, it was a pleasure to find someone willing to give a little bit of info to help me out AND lend me the tool to do the job :d
 

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Great post Russ iam sure it will help alot of people theres nothing like getting every last drop from your pads a true Scotsman:d :rofl:
 

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3 - These pisrons require to be wound clockwise as they're pushed back in. This "rewinds" the handbrake mechanism within the caliper. The Blue Point special tool used, has two lugs on the end piece that locate into the piston and turn it as the piston returns.

I am an ex-time served mechanic and worked in the trade for over 9 years. This was the first time I'd done a set of pads on the Scenic, and before I even attempted the job I had asked a Renault Tech of there was anything specific I had to look out for when doing this job. His only remark was that the piston had to be wound back into the caliper and not just pushed back. I didn't want to take the chance on wrecking the calipers, so I did as he suggested.
No doubt there are cars who's rear caliper pistons can be just pushed back, but this isn't one of them.
On a slightly different note, it was a pleasure to find someone willing to give a little bit of info to help me out AND lend me the tool to do the job :d
:rofl: OMG! Really? And for 9 years you haven't learnt that brake pushpistons are NEVER turned because the seals (thin rubber O-rings around the piston) tear off?
Man, I am no mechanic, but even I know there's completely different way of releasing hand brake cable.
And what's more - why even bother release the handbrake cable? What will happen in your "expert" opinion if you just push the piston back w/ tool or no tool? :eek:
Hey, do you recall - there's a guy here in this forum who complained about brakes failure and strage smell.
Maybe just some "expert" like you turned his pistons too.
And in order not to bring the discussion on a lower level - please do refer to a single Renault Technical note specifying turning of brake piston in release of handbrake cable.
For 9 years in the job you should be familiar with Renault TNs right? :confused:

Shish, people be careful when giving advice. Someone might get hurt this way.
 

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DemonXP.


I have every faith in Gonesceniles post and if I ever attempt this task I will follow his advice to the letter.

It is very poor show for a fellow Member to show disrespect to another.


Regards

Ottoman
 

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DemonXP.


I have every faith in Gonesceniles post and if I ever attempt this task I will follow his advice to the letter.

It is very poor show for a fellow Member to show disrespect to another.


Regards

Ottoman
Ottoman,

What and who you follow is you own issue and responsibility.
However, a mechanic working on brakes has to follow exactly the TN prescribed by Renault.

Those say: NEVER turn. Literally. And for 9 years in business he has to ask SO else?

And please, "disrespect"?!
Respect the lives of the people whose cars you are working on - brake failure may cost someone's life.

Regards,
Bulgarian
 

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Ottoman,

What and who you follow is you own issue and responsibility.
However, a mechanic working on brakes has to follow exactly the TN prescribed by Renault.

Those say: NEVER turn. Literally. And for 9 years in business he has to ask SO else?

And please, "disrespect"?!
Respect the lives of the people whose cars you are working on - brake failure may cost someone's life.

Regards,
Bulgarian

Why do you think the " Special tool was made for and supplied by ".


Regards

Ottoman
 

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Ottoman,

I have pliers.
They're called special tool # 2192 as per the dialogys.

Man, just look at the last photo - where the handbrake cable hooks, and tell me honestly - do you really think that by rotating the piston it would unlock?

It's getting a lame discussion although a useful one maybe.
Renault says "never rotate". What's more to discuss here? Beliefs? Probabilities?
Not with my car, no.

Regards,
Bulgarian
 

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Yep, laugh it up, when you don't have nothing reasonable to add why not just laugh, point with the finger and wave CVs around.
Niiiiice:cool:
 

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Hi Demon - many thanks for your comments regarding the fitting of brake pads - and no doubt you have opened a lively discussion here on this forum. I have a copy of the official renault workshop manual and thought I'll have a look and see what it recommends. It states there are two distinctly different tools for retracting caliper pistons and are listed as follows.
Front:- Tool No. Fre.823
Rear:- Toll No. Fre 1190-01
Both are distinctly different - the front tool only pushes the piston back but the rear tool pushes the piston back whilst turning it clockwise. It makes no mention of not turning the front brakes caliper pistons but it accepted practice in the motor trade not to - this is to minimise damage from an excessively worn or scored piston. The Haynes manual also states "turn the rear caliper piston clockwise, whilst similtaneously pressing the piston into the cylinder until it will go no further"
Just hope this will clarify the situation.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Given the fact that I have no inclination to get into a public slagging match over this issue AND the fact that I KNOW I'm right, I'll keep my distasteful comments to myself.

Thanks to the people who read this post and have commented constuctively.
 
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Please can we desist from allowing this to deteriorate any further

Gonescenile - thanks for the excellent post

Demonxp - Gonescenile has his opinion and you have yours. Please try to be less blunt in the future

madnoel10 - thanks for the clarification

This thread shows very clearly how differing views should be carefully considered before taking one opinion over the other

Thank you for the contribution as always...
 

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You're quite right, but just to clarify, the piston has to be rotated to reset the handbrake adjuster - it's the same as Saab used on their front discs, I had to make a tool to turn the pistons on those in the eighties when I had one.

Thanks for the excellent post, Gonescenile, I'm looking forward to the cambelt change tutorial ...?

All the best,

Charles
 
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