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Discussion Starter #1
I was just wondering whether or not spending on average over £100 a month on repairs on a 4 and a half year old scenic 1.6 is typical? Is anyone else shelling out money for problem after problem? My husband and I have worked out that since June last year we've spent £1050 on our car. This does include a service and mot and two tyres but i still think it's excessive. Have I just always had good cars and this is typical of renault (as my garage thinks). I'm getting fed up with this car, the EMU light has started flashing today so I'm back to the garage again tomorrow. :steam:
 

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I was just wondering whether or not spending on average over £100 a month on repairs on a 4 and a half year old scenic 1.6 is typical? Is anyone else shelling out money for problem after problem? My husband and I have worked out that since June last year we've spent £1050 on our car. This does include a service and mot and two tyres but i still think it's excessive. Have I just always had good cars and this is typical of renault (as my garage thinks). I'm getting fed up with this car, the EMU light has started flashing today so I'm back to the garage again tomorrow. :steam:
I had the same experience with a vauxhall vectra once - forked out over 2k in a 6 month period on various jobs. This was the days before i was as educated about cars/dealers :rolleyes:

Is your garage independent or linked to renault out of curiosity?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Have used both dealer and independent - at one point I had it in a dealer for three weeks as they had no idea of the problem. Currently using a local garage that used to do work for a local dealer before it shut. All dealers about 20 miles away now, not good with 2 children under 3.
 

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Hi there, no - I would sincerely hope that this type of expenditure and hassle is not typical.

Sometimes cars go through a rough patch whereby components seem to all fail and need replacement at the same time, in other occasions, one component's failure shortens the lifespan of another.

I realise it may sound easy to be philosophical from the outside (I've been there too), I had a bad patch with my Scorpio (in all fairness was mainly dealer-related), which prompted me to do the one thing I always swore I'd never do - I sat one day and totalled what had been spent solely on repairs whilst I'd owned the car.

No tyres, servicing, mot's, insurance or tax - just simply the cost of putting things right. The bills totalled in a 8 year period £13,000.

This cost wasn't borne by me - I had kept the car under a series of aftermarket warranties, which I thoroughly researched prior to purchase. Around 80-85% of the above cost was recouped from the warranty.

Touch wood, the car is no longer under warranty (it's 12 years old, and has covered 132,500 miles), but has proved to be quite reliable since.

I would always advocate investing in a good warranty as a safety net - it may not cover every failure, but you'll be glad you have it for the situations when it does.

Hope that you have better days ahead.

Paul:)
 

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Is this reasonable

Hi Carolineth. I would see the costs of MOT, servicing and tyres as a necessary evil but this applies to all motor vehicles. Did you expect to pay no costs during that period? I wish it was that easy. Although the car is only 4 and half year sold – there are many factors that influence running costs. For example how many miles are on the vehicle, how did the previous owner treat it, was it correctly serviced and maintained, etc. As a matter of interest was there any warranty when you bought it? I have driven and worked at Renaults over the past 5 years or more and have found them to be no worse than the average car. In my opinion the MOT, service, and tyre costs have nothing to do with the quality of the vehicle. If you subtract these costs from the overall total you would present a truer picture.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I accept that there are running costs with any car. This one has a full service history and i bought it as an ex motorbility (we've had excellent cars like this before). i drive around 6000 miles a year and maybe we've had a run of bad luck. Besides the normal runnning costs we've had a TDC switch (£90), some sort of ignition chip(£150), a starter motor(£300), fan belt (£60), boot handle (£60) and this morning I've just had a third ignition coil at a cost of £98.00. In six months to me this seems excessive. This is our first renault after 3 ford escorts and I've never spent so much money on a car in such a short space of time. Is it bad luck? can it only get better?
 

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Personally I would never buy an ex company or Motobility car. It's simply this - a driver who isn't responsible for its upkeep will tend to mistreat the vehicle (their attitude tends to be "so what I'm not paying"). Bought an Motobility car once and Oh dear was I bitten.- never again.
 

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I think most of the difficulties are attributed to the type of running the car has had, as opposed to the previous owner's driving style (after all, most brand-new cars are sold to fleets as either company cars or hire hire/lease cars, therefore this trickles down throughout the second-hand market).

When I was with Ford, I noticed a trend, it was the low annual-mileage cars (used primarily for short, stop-start journeys) that gave rise to the most problems. Things like clutch/brake and exhaust replacement at some pretty low mileages. I think that motability cars tend to fall into this category (much like ex-channel island cars), and are mistakenly interpreted in the following way; lower mileage = less wear & tear = less problems = more valuable car.

I wouldn't like to say that all the expense (of the unforeseen variety) is behind you - you may keep the car, and something else fails, or you may sell your car (probably taking a financial hit), only for someone else to reap the benefit of your expenditure to date.

Its a situation we all face - every mile we travel in our cars brings each component closer to failure.

Whatever you decide, try to ensure that you don't make your decision in the heat of the moment.

Paul:)
 

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I think most of the difficulties are attributed to the type of running the car has had, as opposed to the previous owner's driving style (after all, most brand-new cars are sold to fleets as either company cars or hire hire/lease cars, therefore this trickles down throughout the second-hand market).

When I was with Ford, I noticed a trend, it was the low annual-mileage cars (used primarily for short, stop-start journeys) that gave rise to the most problems. Things like clutch/brake and exhaust replacement at some pretty low mileages. I think that motability cars tend to fall into this category (much like ex-channel island cars), and are mistakenly interpreted in the following way; lower mileage = less wear & tear = less problems = more valuable car.

I wouldn't like to say that all the expense (of the unforeseen variety) is behind you - you may keep the car, and something else fails, or you may sell your car (probably taking a financial hit), only for someone else to reap the benefit of your expenditure to date.

Its a situation we all face - every mile we travel in our cars brings each component closer to failure.

Whatever you decide, try to ensure that you don't make your decision in the heat of the moment.

Paul:)

Well said Vel - maintenance is everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This car is not particularly low mileage (40000 over 4.5 years) and has been well maintained by us and the previous owners (an older couple with a wheelchair). We took time to choose the car and had it inspected before we bought it from the dealers. We are going to keep it as I feel we have no option having spent so much money on it, but I've been very disappointed and will never buy a renault again.

Thanks for all your comments. :)

I'm sure we'll be asking for advice again soon as something is bound to go wrong again! lol
 

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Fingers crossed that the car has tossed its toys out of the pram for the foreseeable future.

All the best,

Paul:)
 
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Anything going wrong with the car during the first 6 months should be down to the dealer as part of your consumer rights!

Hope it settles down now.
 

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Most of the things that you have spent out on are unfortunately common problems on newer Scenics.TDC sensors give problems on all modern Renaults,ignition coils are infamous on all modern 16 valve Renault engines,and the boot lock problem is common to all Scenics.A starter motor or auxillary belt can fail on any car,but all in all you have been extremely unlucky.

There is nothing to say that if you'd bought any other European make of car that the story would have been any different either.If you want reliability,buy Japanese!.:eek:

Good luck for the next 6 months,I hope you begin to enjoy your Renault!:)
 

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Where Renault fall down they do not react to the faults whether it is a design fault or a manufacturing defect they just seem to let it go on even so called updated models will still carry the problems.


Regards

Ottoman
 

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Personally I would never buy an ex company or Motobility car. It's simply this - a driver who isn't responsible for its upkeep will tend to mistreat the vehicle (their attitude tends to be "so what I'm not paying"). Bought an Motobility car once and Oh dear was I bitten.- never again.
I think that is a terrible statement regarding motability cars, perhaps company car drivers abuse their cars but motability drivers NEED their cars and pay a lot of money every month to have it. Why would someone with mobility problems who relies on their car abuse it and risk being stranded with a broken car?
Modern cars should have no problem with doing small mileages, however my scenic is now getting a THIRD new autogearbox in less than 6000 miles from new. The problem is with the poor reliability by renault cars which is further exasperated by renault uk's rotten attitude towards their customers. Thanksfully motability is now taking my car off me due to the amount of problems i've had and i'll be getting a new car, definetley not another renault!
I hope the OP has better luck in the future with their car.
 

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I think that is a terrible statement regarding motability cars, perhaps company car drivers abuse their cars but motability drivers NEED their cars and pay a lot of money every month to have it. Why would someone with mobility problems who relies on their car abuse it and risk being stranded with a broken car?
Modern cars should have no problem with doing small mileages, however my scenic is now getting a THIRD new autogearbox in less than 6000 miles from new. The problem is with the poor reliability by renault cars which is further exasperated by renault uk's rotten attitude towards their customers. Thanksfully motability is now taking my car off me due to the amount of problems i've had and i'll be getting a new car, definetley not another renault!
I hope the OP has better luck in the future with their car.
Hi there, I agree with what you are saying (the point I was making was not a slur on the drivers themselves), it is a fact though, that cars which do very low mileages (where the engines barely reach operating temps, and there is a lot of gearchanging/braking/steering efforts - i.e. intense town driving) takes its toll on the car (regardless of make) at a greater rate than the same amount of miles covered on a motorway. An indicator of this would be the difference in fuel consumption - it reduces as the car works harder.

I would sooner buy a 2year old car with 40,000 miles on the clock, than a 10year old one, with the same mileage (an extreme example, but you'll know what I mean).

Paul:)
 

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Yeah fair comment Paul, I appreciate what you are saying regards more wear & tear and having owned various high mileage cars would agree to a point. Unfortunatley most non-petrolheads will always buy a low mileage car.
 

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Yeah fair comment Paul, I appreciate what you are saying regards more wear & tear and having owned various high mileage cars would agree to a point. Unfortunatley most non-petrolheads will always buy a low mileage car.


You can still stay on the Forums Bigdavy even tho you do not drive a Renault, It would be useful to have a comparison, Also I'm sure your years of motoring experiances can still be put to good use here.

Regards


Ottoman
 

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You can still stay on the Forums Bigdavy even tho you do not drive a Renault, It would be useful to have a comparison, Also I'm sure your years of motoring experiances can still be put to good use here.

Regards


Ottoman
Thanks ottoman, i'll be happy to drop in and catch up with everyone. Looks like i'll be going for the Citroen so yes it will give us all the chance to compare.;)
 
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