Independent Renault Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Recently bought a 2000 Megane Coupe Convertible, and as it was running a bit rough decided to do a quick service.

While changing the plugs, I noticed how old and rusty the ones in it looked, when I got to number 3 it would not 'grab' with the socket and appears to be rung.

Is there anyway of removing it, due to the deep recess and being behind the manifold, access is really limited !
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
519 Posts
By 'rung', do you mean the corners on the hex body have rounded off?

If so, then did you use a 12- or 6-point socket on the plugs? 6-sided ones are to be preferred, with less potential to round off the corners.

If that doesn't work, then a deep socket of a slightly smaller size (possibly imperial?) could possibly be hammered onto the plug to gain sufficient purchase.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It was a 6 sided socket that was used, but I don't believe it was the villain.

I might try the smaller socket method but would be concerned if it made it worse
 
O

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
It's possible that the last owner left he little rubber bit in the socket on the plug. They sometimes stick to the plug when you pull the socket out.
If you have a socket without this rubber, then you should be able to push it on. Use a mirror to have peek inside the recess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Recently bought a 2000 Megane Coupe Convertible, and as it was running a bit rough decided to do a quick service.

While changing the plugs, I noticed how old and rusty the ones in it looked, when I got to number 3 it would not 'grab' with the socket and appears to be rung.

Is there anyway of removing it, due to the deep recess and being behind the manifold, access is really limited !


I personnaly would take it 2 a garage n get them 2 change it a know you end up payin over the odds but if u end up snapping it then ur gona b even more buggered. or if u can get them in try gripping wid some plyers but again big chance of snapping
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
43,291 Posts
Replace all the spark plugs. Using your socket and extension measure how far down it reaches on a good plug and then compare the depth on the suspect plug.

A look down inside using a mirror or taking a photo using a digital camera may reveal the exact problem.

Before going any further try to establish the exact cause as its possible to wring the neck off a seized spark plug. Should this happen then its a cylinder head off job.:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
519 Posts
The hex size is nominally 16mm, but you'd probably get a deep 5/8" socket on there. With the engine hot, squirt a good amount of 'Plus-Gas' down the plug well, and leave overnight. An impact wrench set to a low torque may work slightly better than manual 'graunching'.

The above advice on trying to see exactly what's going on is well worth following - but I realise it can be a bit awkward :(
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Replace all the spark plugs. Using your socket and extension measure how far down it reaches on a good plug and then compare the depth on the suspect plug.

A look down inside using a mirror or taking a photo using a digital camera may reveal the exact problem.

Before going any further try to establish the exact cause as its possible to wring the neck off a seized spark plug. Should this happen then its a cylinder head off job.:)
thats a good idea about measuring the distance lol

I will have a go at that
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top