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Hi there, I am originally from Dundee (please, no applause), and when I moved to Glasgow - I noticed many words which were different to the ones I was used to. It's a bit of a laugh (so apologies for any spelling errors) - can you guess what this word means?

Cundie (it's not a swear word);)

If you get it - you need to post the next one for us to guess.

Enjoy!

Paul:)
 

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I can't believe that nobody's been brave enough to try...surely somebody reads "Oor Wullie" or "The Broons"?

Don't be shy - you see these all the time whilst driving.

Paul:)
 

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Good man!

It's your turn now...

Paul:)
 

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Still a Petrolhead but also like diesel
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I can't believe that nobody's been brave enough to try...surely somebody reads "Oor Wullie" or "The Broons"?

Don't be shy - you see these all the time whilst driving.

Paul:)
Been a Glaswegian all my life Paul and I've never heard the word cundie before ... if it was The Broons or Oor Wullie while mythically Glaswegians, Id guess its just a Dundonian myth that the writers thought thats what we called a manhole cover or drain cover in the West of Scotland? (the Sunday Post is an Dundee written and produced paper is it not ?) ...

I always thought it was called a stank ..... or maybe we just didnt have "cundies" in the West-End :p

Heres one for you "dachie"

:rofl: :rofl:
 

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Well, the Sunday Post (part of the D C Thomson group of publications) is printed in Glasgow and Dundee (and Aberdeen since they bought the Press & Journal), but yes, the editorial content is controlled in Dundee.

I used to be a Newspaper Sales Manager with John Menzies - hence the anorak knowledge.;)

Dachie? Now I'm stumped! What does it rhyme with? (Just in case I've heard the word - just never seen it written).

Thanks in advance,

Paul:)
 

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Still a Petrolhead but also like diesel
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Mmmm rhyme ... cakey, bakey ..... about as good as its going to get me thinks, and a clue as well :)
 

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Well, I'm not ashamed to admit that I'm stumped.

A right puzzler.

Paul:)
 

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I do know what 'Feb' means, and come to think of it, I think I was in Dundee the only time when I was referenced by the term. I hadn't even done anything to earn it - I think the user just thought he was being clever by using an insult that he thought I wouldn't recognise.

Of course, being there on business, I had to just let it slide. Though if I'd had the opportunity to make him a cup of tea, I'd probably have spat in it.
 

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Still a Petrolhead but also like diesel
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Ok, I'll put you out your misery ....

Dachie according to my mother-in-law, who was from Carluke (small mining town in central Lanarkshire) is the description used when cake, bread or similar has a stodgy texture that sticks to the roof of your mouth (getting a bit like "call my bluff" here)

whos next? :)
 
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