Independent Renault Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just been reading about how scientists predict that Perth in Australia might be the first metropolis that might have to be abandoned due to a lack of drinking water. Seeing as it is on the cost, what exactly stops us being able to desalinate sea water and turn it into drinking water?
 

·
RIP 31-12-2008
Joined
·
5,807 Posts
The four MSF Desalination Plants in Abu Dhabi produce eight million gallons per day each, also they have many smaller units.
 

·
RIP 31-12-2008
Joined
·
5,807 Posts
As far as I am aware they produce water for drinking, industrial use and irrigation, there are smaller projects in Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria and Spain including the Canary Islands,
Regards Leroy
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,109 Posts
Its usually cost which is the major factor (that's why the Saudis can do it).

There are basically 2 main methods; one involves a chemical separation with ion-exchange resins (basically taking the sodium chloride out of the water), the water would then be filtered as normal through layers of sand.
The other involves boiling the water off which is then condensed and collected - the salt is left behind.

Strange to think that as polar ice caps start melting (which introduces more water into the eco-system) that some areas of the globe will be worse off than before.

Paul:)
 

·
RIP 31-12-2008
Joined
·
5,807 Posts
As you say Paul the cost is a major factor which is why the Saudi's have the backing of major oil companies including Total/Elf for their plants,
Regards Leroy
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys. I wondered whether it might have been the cost involved that but countries off persuing this...
 

·
RIP 31-12-2008
Joined
·
5,807 Posts
At the moment there are experimental units involving solar power taking place, so hopefully the costs of conversion could fall,
Regards Leroy
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top