Independent Renault Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,145 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I believe there is quite a market for The sinclair Zx now nostalgia buff's or what ...


Regards

Ottoman
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,475 Posts
I was always on the other side of the fence. Started with a Vic-20 and progressed onto a Commodore 64. There was always pretty intense rivalry between the Commodore and Sinclair camps. My brother had a Spectrum 48K with a replacement keyboard. Done legitimately mind you (a lot of people bought Spectrums, gutted the motherboards out of them, took them back to Dixons as faulty and then bought a new case/keyboard.)

No doubt about it, the Commodore was technically superior, but the Spectrum was easier to program, partly thanks to its lack of bells and whistles, and partly because the Z80 just has a much more flexible instruction set than the 6502/6510. The Spectrum had some cracking games almost from day one. Most of the Ultimate games were good, and I reckon I'd still play Lunar Jetman on an emulator if I could be bothered setting it up.

All the C64 had going for it for ages was Attack of the Mutant Camels. But once people got to grips with how the machine really worked, it took off and surpassed just about everything else on the market.

Oh, and the C64 had Compunet, which was brilliant.

Compunet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A bit like the Internet, but years before it happened. Okay, it was still run by a single provider who ultimately had total editorial control, but it was pretty anarchic at times, and I don't remember anything ever being censored even when we were having a pop at the managment :p

Some will rightly point out that other computers (e.g. the Beeb) had Micronet, but that was nowhere near as good or as much fun.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,929 Posts
How things have changed.

I must confess I loved my spectrum and wrote quite a few little programs in Basic for it...easy-peasy.

Nowadays I can't even fathom out my new mobile:crazy:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
644 Posts
what i remember the most about the spectrum is the waiting for what seemed a lifetime for the cassete to completly load,only to find it didnt

think i still got a c64 in the loft
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,475 Posts
Jeez blast from the past there Horatio ...:)
Fond memories of the days when nobody really gave a hoot about copyright, let alone patent infringement :p (Then Atari came and spoiled it by clamping down on the Pacman clones.)

I loved the old 8 bit days. No such thing as a virus - when you wanted to load a different program, you switched off the power and instantly nuked anything nasty that might be lurking. Most (decent) stuff still written in assembler, by people who'd heard of 'code optimisation' (though I've got to admit that I'm just as lazy as the rest of them in that respect these days.)

And Compunet was brilliant! Nearly everyone who had it was glued to it every night, even though there was no such thing as a free phone call back then. It had forums, chat, and even a MUD game. Atmosphere-wise, it was a lot like this forum, but about 20 years ago.
what i remember the most about the spectrum is the waiting for what seemed a lifetime for the cassete to completly load,only to find it didnt
The C64 was worse before someone invented the turbo loader. Not only did it save things to tape very slowly, but it actually saved two copies. Rather than having anything as complex as a checksum, it actually loaded the first and then verified it against the second, giving you 'load error' if there was a problem. Once you knew this, you could just about halve the loading time of a game (up to 20 mins) by pressing the RUN/STOP key just over half way through.

I was lucky in that I got a disk drive with mine. Then again, I was unlucky in that it broke within a week, went back to Commodore, they 'lost' it, and the whole mess took over 6 months to sort out.

Though even the C64 disk drive was slow (due to technical reasons that I can bore you senseless with if you really want.) I bought Dolphin Dos for mine, which hooked the drive's I/O chip directly to the computer's via a parallel cable. It flew after that!
think i still got a c64 in the loft
I think I've still got two of the things in our loft, along with a 1541 disk drive and the old Compunet brick modem somewhere. Also up there is the remnants of an Amiga 500 with a 50mb hard disk that cost more than the computer.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,109 Posts
I still have my Spectrum 48k in its box with all instructions, cables and tapes (Horizons). Quite a few games as well...

What I loved about it (and what probably helped kill it off), was that each of my classmates bought a game (circa £2-£5) and a blank tape. We each then circulated the games and copied them onto our blank tape - so for around £6, we had 20 games...

Oh, and I've still got my Super Nintendo, plus lightscope all in the same nick - happy days!;)

My other half just shakes her head...:rolleyes:

Paul:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,794 Posts
Brings back memories, was pregnant at the time we had one and had to rest a lot, used to play River Raid for hours on that:)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,109 Posts
I remember the Amstrad - there were 2 versions, one with a green monitor, one with a colour monitor and the choice of tape or floppy disc drive (I suppose that's 4 versions really:rolleyes: ).

What spec was yours?

Paul:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,909 Posts
I remember the Amstrad - there were 2 versions, one with a green monitor, one with a colour monitor and the choice of tape or floppy disc drive (I suppose that's 4 versions really:rolleyes: ).

What spec was yours?

Paul:)
:rofl: Colour screen and tape deck and i had a flight simulator game that took 40mins to load by tape deck:d :rofl: God i do not where i would be with the likes of that today i need my 360 :d
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,909 Posts
Used to buy tha mag every month as well to get games but you had to program the game in yourself DIY :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,475 Posts
What I loved about it (and what probably helped kill it off), was that each of my classmates bought a game (circa £2-£5) and a blank tape. We each then circulated the games and copied them onto our blank tape - so for around £6, we had 20 games...
I think we were all at it. What money we had, we'd spend on hardware, so easily duplicated software didn't get a look in.

All of the programmers seemed to be earning money that we (as teenagers, in my case at least) could only dream of. With high profile companies like Imagine openly boasting that they had money coming out of their ears, how were we expected to feel guilty?

And let's face it, all Imagine ever did was bring the full colour glossy magazine ad to the world of computer games. Their software was crap. They just knew a thing or two about marketing.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,109 Posts
LOAD "" anyone?

Oh happy days! I remember when the spectrum + was launched (was a bit jealous) until someone pointed out that if the computer was turned upside down (don't ask how they found that out) all the keys fell out!

I was (as a child) allowed a maximum game time of 1 hour, twice a week - if I chose wisely, I could get the main telly (in colour) as opposed to my black & white portable.

How things have changed (not necessarily for the better).

Great trip down memory lane.

Paul:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,710 Posts
Used to buy tha mag every month as well to get games but you had to program the game in yourself DIY :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
Yep - I remember buying magazines, spending hours programming the VIC 20 - only then to spend many more hours going through correcting "syntax errors" and other mistakes still to find the program didn't work. Or if it did work - it was [email protected] and not worth the time and effort!

10 print "hello"
20 goto 10
etc
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,109 Posts
Computers were so much more like cars of that era - you were prepared to compromise, and get up to your elbows in it (they could be worked on), just for the bit of pleasure they provided when the planets were in alignment - and they worked properly.

Maybe it was then, maybe it was us - who knows, maybe its just getting older that replaces enthusiasm with cynicism.

Oh, well - enough philosophy for today!

Paul:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,710 Posts
I was (as a child) allowed a maximum game time of 1 hour, twice a week - if I chose wisely, I could get the main telly (in colour) as opposed to my black & white portable.
Yep - on rare occasions I got to use the main,only colour telly in the house, much to the annoyance of my older sister!( :p to her).
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top