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Whos the greatest biker?

  • Mike Hailwood

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Bill Ivy

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • David Jefferies

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Valentino Rossi

    Votes: 2 11.8%
  • Mick Doohan

    Votes: 1 5.9%
  • Joey Dunlop

    Votes: 7 41.2%
  • Carl Fogarty

    Votes: 2 11.8%
  • Barry Sheene

    Votes: 1 5.9%
  • Jarno Saarinen

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Kenny Roberts Snr.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Giacomo Agostini

    Votes: 4 23.5%
  • John Surtees

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Geoff Duke

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Jim Redman

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Gary Hocking

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Mick Grant

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Phil Read

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Kevin Schwantz

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Troy Bayliss

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Max Biaggi

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    17
  • Poll closed .
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
Here we have the list of nominations for the bike section,the poll will be open for 2 weeks.:)

Gentleman,start your voting.:)
 

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Premium Member
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14,145 Posts
Ago for me.

Just an amazing rider.

His record speaks for itself and of course MV Agusta bikes

500cc/MotoGP world championships: 8 -1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972 and 1975.
500cc/MotoGP race wins: 68

In terms of success, Giacomo Agostini is the undisputed king of motorcycle racing, having claimed seven consecutive premier-class world championships, and then taken an eighth two-years later. The Italian also heads the all time premier-class win list with 68 victories and took a further seven consecutive world titles - and 54 wins - in the 350cc world championship.

After winning Italian national championships and finishing fourth as a wild-card in the 1964 350cc Italian GP, Agostini was signed by MV Agusta for a full time ride in the 1965 350 and 500cc world championships.

'Ago' made an instant impact by winning the 350cc season-opener and only lost the title to Jim Redman after a mechanical problem at the final round. Giacomo also finished second in the 500cc championship, behind team-mate Mike Hailwood, with one victory to his credit.

Hailwood moved to Honda for 1966, leaving Agostini to lead the MV Agusta attack. The Italian would win three races on his way to a hard fought first 500cc world championship victory over the Englishman.

Agostini and MV Agusta would successfully defend that title for the next six seasons, although the 1967 championship was only decided in their favour by a tie-break over Hailwood. However, Honda’s withdraw and the retirement of Hailwood meant that the 1968 title was one of Agostini’s easiest; he won all ten races and also took his first 350cc crown.

The Italian’s total domination of 500cc would continue throughout 1969 and 1970 with another ten wins apiece (from twelve and eleven starts respectively), followed by eight wins in a row in 1971 and then a new high of eleven victories (out of thirteen starts) in 1972.

The bubble finally burst in 1973 when new team-mate Phil Read broke Agostini’s stranglehold on the 500cc class. Then, in a brave move that would be repeated by countryman Valentino Rossi some 20 years later, Agostini made headlines by leaving the dominant manufacturer and signing for Yamaha.

The best Yamaha had finished fourth the previous season and Agostini would match that placing in his first year with the Japanese team - taking two victories while Read and MV Agusta comfortably retained title. However, Agostini did successfully defend the 350cc title – his seventh in succession and first with Yamaha.

1975 then saw Agostini take his premier-class revenge as he took four wins and went on to beat Read in a last round title decider. It marked the first 500cc world championship for Yamaha, a two-stroke machine and the first time MV Agusta had lost the title since 1957!

But the win proved something of a false dawn for Yamaha who would struggle to match the new four-cylinder Suzuki in 1976. Agostini switched back to MV Agusta and took victory in the German season finale. The win would be Agostini’s 122nd GP win and, fittingly, the last achieved by both himself and the famous MV Agusta brand. The 35-year-old would retire gracefully at the end of 1977, his place in history assured.
 

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Premium Member
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274 Posts
In my opinion, you should include the unlucky Wayne Rainey ;) ...
Mick Doohan for me, anyway :) !!
 

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Super Moderator
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43,291 Posts
I voted for good old Joey Dunlop - the boy from a Armoy.
But I still think Bob MacIntyre should have been in there - the first person to lap the Isle of Man at an average 100 mph - some feat in its day riding a Gilera 500:)
 

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Premium Member
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2,448 Posts
Wish I could have had 3 votes (at least).

With only 1 it has to be Ago, The sound of that MV Agusta being ridden hard will stay with me forever

good list of names there
 

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Super Moderator
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43,291 Posts
Yeh Agostini was superb when he was on form - I remember him racing in the Ulster TT in the 350 and 500 classes. During the 500 he stopped at the pits one lap from home just to check his time - went out again and still won. There was just nothing else around at that time to match the acceleration of his bike. He also had an instinct on how far to lean a bike over before losing it - he had total control over the bike but yet knew its limitations. I remember reading a short biography about him which claimed from the age of 6 he could ride his bicycle round the streets of his home town along the kerb edges - each about 5-6" wide - yet never falter - he had an inate sense of balance and would have made an excellent tight-rope walker.
 

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Premium Member
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40,429 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I'm slightly shocked,but very proud that Joey Dunlop is top at the moment.:)

We have some proper hardcore bikers on the forum.......unlike myself.:eek:.
 

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Premium Member
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1,299 Posts
Hard to vote for just one. Joey Dunlop for me. King of the Isle of Man. Mike Hailwood drove an SM to all his meets around europe so he gets a nod. Wayne Gardner comes over every year for the Barry Sheene memorial trophy race at Goodwood Revival. Top bloke.

They are all special.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It's finished now.:eek:

I think it's going to be repeated over the next few weeks,so if you have the channel it's worth keeping an eye out for it,I certaintly learnt a lot.

ESPN Classic shows a lot of decent stuff but it's a channel I often forget about.:eek:
 
P

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It's finished now.:eek:

I think it's going to be repeated over the next few weeks,so if you have the channel it's worth keeping an eye out for it,I certaintly learnt a lot.

ESPN Classic shows a lot of decent stuff but it's a channel I often forget about.:eek:
A guy I know used to do the design work on his bikes. He has some great stories........
 

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Premium Member
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14,145 Posts
Joey Dunlop Memorial Garden

A very fitting tribute to Joey Dunlop

Joey Dunlop, born in Ballymoney in 1952, was affectionately known to motorcycle racing fans and competitors alike as 'King of the Roads' and 'Yer Maun'. Through his courage and ambition, he became one of the most successful riders of all time.

He was tragically killed while racing in Estonia in July 2000. His incredible sporting career included five Formula One World Championships. 13 wins at the North West 200 races. 24 wins at the Ulster Grand Prix and a world record of 26 wins at the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy. In May 2001, Ballymoney Borough Council officially opened the Joey Dunlop Memorial Garden.

In this beautiful setting, visitors have time to reflect on the unprecedented achievements of this much loved international motorcycling legend.

















 
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