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Discussion Starter #1
In my attempt to squeeze as many miles out of a gallon of petrol, I aim to fit a vacuum gauge to my engine, a 1.4 injection as fitted to a MK1 Clio. Now in the past I have used these gauges to good effect on Carburettor engines, but now I have an injected engine, single point injection I believe and am pretty clueless as to where I can plumb in the vacuum gauge to give the best reading.


In the past it was easy, plumb into the vac advance for the distributor and observing and driving to the gauge, I managed to get a further twelve mpg on a a steady run, not so much improvement around town, but the thing was underpowered anyway. but I am from experience sold on the benefits of fitting a permanent vacuum gauge, so I ask here where to fit on an injected engine.

So I ask of all the engine techs here, where might a good vaccum reading be taken off as a permanent fixture ?
 

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HotShoe WANNABEE..
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375 Posts
Tapping into the [plastic] Inlet Manifold? - any plastic swarf at least would be combustible.
Have I seen 'thick' gaskets (under the TB) and this adapter predrilled by supplier [as in Specific Model 'kit']

Methinkssss..:think:

:loser:
knownClone
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, thanks everyone, it does seem the area of the MAP sensor is the place to seek fitment, and better than perhaps the inlet manifold due to what I hear about oil getting in there, would hate to think the guage was sucking up oil, although I expect it won't harm it or impede it's fuction.

The last Vac guage I had fitted to a car was a Gunson's low guage modified for lighting, I found it very useful for establishing the best fuel performance and monitoring the top end of the engine, as it really did help to know what the readings were saying about the condition of wear in my engine, which was a flat four air cooled engine prone to destroying itself. I also used an oil temp and pressure guage on that engine after I blew my first engine up due to not knowing what was going on back there. The fault, the timing slipped and blew a hole through no.3 piston, the one that ran the hottest, the detonation blew the rocker covers off and sump plate setting fire to the oil as I was driving down Haldon Hill. After all that, guages are the way to go, stop problems before they become expensive and inconvenient.
 
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